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What sort of old roofing is this?

The neighborhood that I live in was mostly built in the 1920s. Most of the original homes in the neighborhood are being torn down and replaced with 2-4 story townhomes. I'm curious, anyone got any thoughts about this roofing. Several of the homes have or did have this sort of stuff when we moved in.





The reason that I ask is that the 1920s home that we are working on purchasing will likely need to have the roof replaced. We are curious about attractive, period correct and durable roofing options. I've never seen any roofing like this before coming to the neighborhood that we're in now. I would be surprised if it was original as that would make it 90+ years old, but you never know. They don't make things like they used to.

A lot of the central Texas homes have metal roofs, I've been told, due to the durability against hail which is more common farther inland.

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Old 10-28-2020, 08:48 AM
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Those are just asphalt shingles. Readily available, not old.

Like this:

https://www.iko.be/en/products/armourshield
Old 10-28-2020, 08:55 AM
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Cool, thanks. It's interesting that many of the old homes in this neighborhood had them. Maybe there was a big storm years ago, and some company came through offering the same tile and a bunch of folks purchased.
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Old 10-28-2020, 09:08 AM
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By George, I think you've discovered how fly-by-night roofing contractors fleece the unwary public.
Old 10-28-2020, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by javadog View Post
Those are just asphalt shingles. Readily available, not old.

Like this:

https://www.iko.be/en/products/armourshield
Nevertheless, that roof is old. It's not uncommon for an older asphalt roof to last 60 years with maintenance.

But, in TX, IDK. That rook could be 20 years old but there was no roof edge installed which tells me it's been there awhile.
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Old 10-28-2020, 09:23 AM
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These types of shingles are similar to the "T" shaped (interlocking) shingles in that some believe them to more resistant to blowing off when put over several layers of old shingles.
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Old 10-28-2020, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Zeke View Post
It's not uncommon for an older asphalt roof to last 60 years with maintenance.
Asbestos?
Old 10-28-2020, 09:31 AM
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Actually, I'm pretty sure those are asbestos shingles (at least that's what I've always been told).

The bungalows and duplexes in West U, Montrose and the Height that were built in the teens, 20s and 30s all had them. And they literally last a lifetime, if not physically damaged by trees or hurricanes.

I can't think of any friends that had a horror story on their removal/replacement, but I'd check around. I think there are a couple old-timer roofers that actually may even collect those, as they can be reapplied on other roofs that need replacements. With so many older homes being demolished for new construction, I'd guess there won't be a ton of roofs like that in 20 years.
Old 10-28-2020, 10:02 AM
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Looking at your photos again, I still think the roof may be asbestos, but the wall under the eave looks like it was covered with asphalt shingles that are much newer.

I'd guess that roof is 80-100 years old.
Old 10-28-2020, 10:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brainz01 View Post
Actually, I'm pretty sure those are asbestos shingles (at least that's what I've always been told).

The bungalows and duplexes in West U, Montrose and the Height that were built in the teens, 20s and 30s all had them. And they literally last a lifetime, if not physically damaged by trees or hurricanes.

I can't think of any friends that had a horror story on their removal/replacement, but I'd check around. I think there are a couple old-timer roofers that actually may even collect those, as they can be reapplied on other roofs that need replacements. With so many older homes being demolished for new construction, I'd guess there won't be a ton of roofs like that in 20 years.
Yep, that's exactly where I am, so that makes sense to me. I was wondering if something like that was the case.

Yeah, pretty much all of the homes in my neighborhood (border streets are West Gray, West Dallas, Montrose and Waugh) that go up for sale are being demolished. I did see one where a crew came in and stripped the bricks off of the home and put them on pallets, but all of the rest are reduced to a pile of rubble in an hour or two. I think we've watched 10-15 homes get demolished in the last 6 years since moving here. I think there are 5-10 left, and then another 5-10 that are 4-plexs.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:13 AM
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You should insist that the seller verify via testing whether the shingles are asbestos or not, it will make a big difference in cost and means and methods of replacing the roof if the shingles are asbestos and thus "hazardous".
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brainz01 View Post
Looking at your photos again, I still think the roof may be asbestos, but the wall under the eave looks like it was covered with asphalt shingles that are much newer.

I'd guess that roof is 80-100 years old.
The middle pic is a different house than the top and bottom. It's kind of weird, when we moved it, there'd clearly been a fire and the house has been boarded up. It's still boarded up and hasn't been repaired, but I just recently saw a couple of nice old vehicles (70ish Chevy C10 and mid-50s GM) and some furniture get moved out of the driveway and separate garage. I think they may be planning to sell soon.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric 951 View Post
You should insist that the seller verify via testing whether the shingles are asbestos or not, it will make a big difference in cost and means and methods of replacing the roof if the shingles are asbestos and thus "hazardous".
These are the house that we are buying. The house that we are buying has a modern asphalt roof, but thanks, that's a good call.

The reason that I mentioned our new house is that the missus is wanting to eventually replace the roof with something that looks period and is durable without spending a fortune.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masraum View Post
Yep, that's exactly where I am, so that makes sense to me. I was wondering if something like that was the case.

Yeah, pretty much all of the homes in my neighborhood (border streets are West Gray, West Dallas, Montrose and Waugh) that go up for sale are being demolished. I did see one where a crew came in and stripped the bricks off of the home and put them on pallets, but all of the rest are reduced to a pile of rubble in an hour or two. I think we've watched 10-15 homes get demolished in the last 6 years since moving here. I think there are 5-10 left, and then another 5-10 that are 4-plexs.
I used to own/live in a duplex on the other side of West Gray (Bomar) -- it's still standing, but only a matter of time. It's all getting razed and rebuilt. The better duplex/4-plexes will be the last to go. Still earning good money and the dirt keeps appreciating.

Those houses were built tough (though not well insulated -- i.e., none originally). They had full 3/4 shiplap walls inside and out. The interior shiplap was originally covered with wallpaper, but most were sheet-rocked over the years. Often the [small] closets still had evidence of the wallpaper, though.

Those old homes also had knob and tube wiring -- perhaps the cause of the fire in the one house you pictured. That old cotton insulation would get friable and literally fall off the bare copper if you touched/moved the wire. Scary stuff.

The plumbing was galvanized iron supply lines and clay and/or cast iron DWV. All that plumbing is likely in very bad shape, if it's not been replaced by now.

The wood windows were made of a very rot-resistant wood, but given 100 years, it's not uncommon to have some rot. The cotton sash cords almost certainly have rotted out and the sash weights likely fallen into the wall. There's a few old-timers that specialize in refurbing them. They can usually be returned to good services, though very drafty.

There's another pocket of bungalows like that over by U of H, but it's never been as popular a neighborhood.

Lot's of memories in those old homes, but I don't miss the problems associated with a house that old.
Old 10-28-2020, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Zeke View Post
.....But, in TX, IDK. That roof could be 20 years old.....
Yup.

My HOA requires a 30 year shingle for aesthetic reasons I'm told.

Built my house 12-13 years ago.

I'm on my 3rd roof.

Have a radiant barrier product for the deck.

It's only good for 3 roofs.

Next hail storm they're going to have to tear off not just the shingles but the deck as well.

Hope to out of here before that becomes a reality.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stomachmonkey View Post
Yup.

My HOA requires a 30 year shingle for aesthetic reasons I'm told.

Built my house 12-13 years ago.

I'm on my 3rd roof.

Have a radiant barrier product for the deck.

It's only good for 3 roofs.

Next hail storm they're going to have to tear off not just the shingles but the deck as well.

Hope to out of here before that becomes a reality.
Code for Oklahoma City now is to replace the decking when a new roof is installed. I can only guess the plywood manufacturers donated to the city for that code to be put in place.

Our roof is a 30 year Class 4 hail resistant tiles. In the last hail storm every other roof in our neighborhood had to be replaced and we had just one tiny spot over the garage that showed any slight damage at all.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brainz01 View Post
I used to own/live in a duplex on the other side of West Gray (Bomar) -- it's still standing, but only a matter of time. It's all getting razed and rebuilt. The better duplex/4-plexes will be the last to go. Still earning good money and the dirt keeps appreciating.

Those houses were built tough (though not well insulated -- i.e., none originally). They had full 3/4 shiplap walls inside and out. The interior shiplap was originally covered with wallpaper, but most were sheet-rocked over the years. Often the [small] closets still had evidence of the wallpaper, though.

Those old homes also had knob and tube wiring -- perhaps the cause of the fire in the one house you pictured. That old cotton insulation would get friable and literally fall off the bare copper if you touched/moved the wire. Scary stuff.

The plumbing was galvanized iron supply lines and clay and/or cast iron DWV. All that plumbing is likely in very bad shape, if it's not been replaced by now.
Our old home had Al wiring. I'm not eager to get into knob and tube, but after the Al, I'm not terrified. Fortunately, the place that we're looking at has been updated (wiring and plumbing).

Quote:
The wood windows were made of a very rot-resistant wood, but given 100 years, it's not uncommon to have some rot. The cotton sash cords almost certainly have rotted out and the sash weights likely fallen into the wall. There's a few old-timers that specialize in refurbing them. They can usually be returned to good services, though very drafty.
Milt/Zeke has posted before some of his old window restoration exploits here before. In some ways, I wish I could have spent some time working with/under him at some point. I'd love to have just a drop in the bucket of the knowledge that he's got.
Many of the places over by us still have the original windows. I'm guessing they are mostly "cylinder glass." I'm torn. The place that we're buying has newish vinyl double-pane windows which is great, but at the same time, it's lost a little bit of charm too.

Quote:
There's another pocket of bungalows like that over by U of H, but it's never been as popular a neighborhood.

Lot's of memories in those old homes, but I don't miss the problems associated with a house that old.
We'd love to buy an old home in town too. I suspect this is going to be a new adventure for us. I assume the adventures associated with a 100 year old home are different from those associated with a 40-50 year old home. Yeah, some of the stuff involved in old homes are a huge headache for sure. Hopefully, the fact that the place that we are looking at has modern wiring and, I think, mostly PVC plumbing and modern windows will save me some of those headaches.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:45 AM
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I was watching an episode of Time Team from Great Brittan. There were digging in a lady's yard and went inside her house to discuss the plans and were amazed to see Roman era arches in the house, and a wooden beam from the 1,200s. That is an old house.

My old house was built in the late 1940s and not one thing was standard to modern parts. It had lead drains. It had been modernized in the 1970s to 2 wire copper, and all the electrical was in conduit as the ground. It had 80 amp service and that was maxed out all the time. I had to update it to 200 amp to sell the house.

Old houses look cool, but I don't want to live in one ever again.
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Old 10-28-2020, 12:39 PM
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The roofing shingles are identical to my neighbor's house roof. According to him, roof was installed in 1910 time period. There is no roofer in Buffalo, NY willing to remove asbestos shingles for less than $60K.
Old 10-28-2020, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stomachmonkey View Post
Yup.

My HOA requires a 30 year shingle for aesthetic reasons I'm told.

Built my house 12-13 years ago.

I'm on my 3rd roof.

Have a radiant barrier product for the deck.

It's only good for 3 roofs.

Next hail storm they're going to have to tear off not just the shingles but the deck as well.

Hope to out of here before that becomes a reality.
Wow, that's crazy! Sounds like it's time for a metal roof.

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Old 10-28-2020, 12:55 PM
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