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aka: 'euro911'
 
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Nobody has mentioned this ?

Is it a crack or a piece of debris?

If a crack, is it superficial?

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Old 12-15-2013, 04:16 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #601 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ironhorse View Post
Nobody has mentioned this ?

Is it a crack or a piece of debris?

If a crack, is it superficial?

Yeah, I mentioned it in one of my earlier posts but didn't go into any detail. It was def. not superficial, as oh about 3 gallons of coolant came out of the oil pan when I went to drain the oil before pulling the engine, lol

I am using a different block for the rebuild though (the crack is the reason for the rebuild). Basically I was cleaning out the secondary air system ports on a BMW 2004 545i, and they are over-engineered such that the ports are right beside the exhaust valves and are bad about getting clogged up. I think I knocked some carbon loose and it got down into the cylinder or something, because when I started it after cleaning everything as best I could, my exhaust smelled sweet, then I noticed that the oil in the valve cover looked like a milkshake. Wasn't a good day.

The rest of the pistons had a TON of loose carbon on them when I got the heads off.. like I literally could have scooped it out with a spoon it was so much.

Last edited by schpenxel; 12-15-2013 at 04:21 PM..
Old 12-15-2013, 04:18 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #602 (permalink)
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Here is a good shot of it. To BMW's credit, it had 207K miles on it on the original engine. The cylinders have next to zero wear at the top as well.. pretty impressive. Now if their seals just didn't suck they'd be in business

Old 12-15-2013, 04:23 PM
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I figured with the amount of help this forum provided me, I should at least follow up with the outcome of my rebuild. This was on a 2004 545i with Hastings rings and original pistons. It is an N62B44 engine. I am the first person that I know of to do this process on a BMW engine--the only other person I know of that rebuilt their similar engine had a shop do the polishing process for them.

-------

Note: Throughout all of the initial driving, I did not baby it. I didn't redline it or anything, but I had quite a few runs up to 4-4.5K RPM's, then let it engine brake back down to 1500 or so (used manual mode on the transmission) like some break in procedures recommend. I don't know whether that helped or not, but I have certainly not taken it easy on it.

So, about 3 weeks ago I finally got the engine back in. After plugging in a few wires I apparently missed, it started right up.. and smoked like CRAZY and had some misfire codes. I thought for sure the rings weren't going to seat and I was going to be in trouble. I kept clearing the codes (on BMW's it will shut down a cylinder with a misfire code) and kept running it.. slowly but surely they all went away. At this point it was still smoking pretty bad, but ran decently so I decided to take it for a spin

I drove it.. first 5 miles or so, it was embarrassing to come to a stop it smoked so bad. 10-15 mile mark it was decent enough that I could drive it without a cloud of smoke behind me as long as the wind was blowing. Still a lot of smoke would catch up to me when I came to a stop.

By the 25-30 mile mark all smoking stopped, but I still had a little condensation/water smoke coming out it looked like. Since the car had been sitting in the weather for months, I hoped that water had just gotten into the exhaust system and needed to be burnt out (as opposed to a head gasket or something)

So, I kept driving it.. about the 50 mile mark all smoke, blue and white, went away completely. It now runs perfect and does not smoke a bit. Doesn't matter whether I'm flooring it or it sits idling for 30 minutes. No smoke at all and drives great. It has about 300 miles on it and I'm putting about 100 miles on it a day, so I should find out pretty quick if anything is going to break. I changed the oil twice already. The first change it was pretty dirty, to be expected I would say (no metal or anything like that). Second time it looked like normal barely used motor oil. i.e. not much different than the new oil that was replacing it. I am going to run this third batch of oil for at least 1000 miles before changing it, and have an oil analysis done on it then to see if there are any obvious issues

So, hopefully no one else has to go through this process like I did, but if you do, this process will indeed work on BMW's N62 (N62B44 in my case) engines. I will try to report back if anything negative happens in the near future.

Last edited by schpenxel; 02-24-2014 at 12:45 PM..
Old 02-24-2014, 12:40 PM
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hi schpenxel... what did you wind up doing about the crack in your cylinder liner...?? maybe for peace of mind, do a compression test now and when u do oil changes to see if there are lurking issues about to be a big problem...thx for sharing...sounds like u may of made it all work...thx, bob
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Old 02-24-2014, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by 911 tweaks View Post
hi schpenxel... what did you wind up doing about the crack in your cylinder liner...?? maybe for peace of mind, do a compression test now and when u do oil changes to see if there are lurking issues about to be a big problem...thx for sharing...sounds like u may of made it all work...thx, bob
Block was replaced with one out of a different car.. think I posted that a few pages back but I'm not sure.

The old cracked block may become a coffee table at some point
Old 02-24-2014, 07:01 PM
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Here is another angle to consider in re-ringing your Alusils, Quick Seat Piston Ring Assembly Lubricant. They claim an immediate ring seal to promote "proper" break in. I am in no way associated with Total Seal.

Quick Seat Piston Ring Assembly Lubricant, by Total Seal, 2 - Aircooled.Net VW PartsGrams
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Old 05-07-2014, 05:14 PM
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What an awesome thread!

The only disappointment remains that you are limited in the availability of pistons either over-sized or specialized, which had me do a bit of research which I'd like to throw into the pool for consideration:

Electroplating of iron-cobalt alloy onto aluminum alloy parts

Method for direct plating of iron on aluminum

Willem
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Old 05-23-2014, 02:31 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #608 (permalink)
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If you have a good alusil block you do not have to re hone it or put scotch barite pads on where honing stones would be. Literally take dish washing soap and wash out the cylinders with a sponge and your done. You can use a scotch Bright pad with soap very lightly, it is important not to create new honing marks. You are only cleaning the cylinders! Buy the correct rings, gap them, install with some motor oil and your done. The beauty of alusil is that they use low tension rings which create less drag on the motor. Make sure you double and triple check ring gaps! If they are too tight you will score the cylinders!
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Old 05-31-2014, 07:32 AM
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Almost forgot! Make sure your pistons still has the ferro coat on them! It tends to wear off with high mileage motors. The ferocoat is magnetic ! A small magnet should stick to the side of the piston!
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Old 05-31-2014, 07:35 AM
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what are the right rings? my motor has 50k miles. can I just rering and go? thanks carl
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Old 06-26-2014, 02:40 PM
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