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AdamKaz's Avatar
 
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Update:

Shopping around from LA bodyshops to fix a few small rust spots, and paint the soon-to-be-purchased TRE bodykit. This week I'm going to go talk to:

911 Design
TRE Motorsports
AIR Motorsports
John Esposito's Porsche Repair

Any thoughts on any of these shops? Or other suggestions?

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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 02-21-2015, 07:50 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #61 (permalink)
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Now that suspension and brakes are done, threw on some new shoes and rubber. Picked up the Euromeister 17X9 Fuchs reproductions for the rear, and swapped my factory 16 rears to the front. That buys me better grip and a more aggressive stance all around.

Yokohama has also stepped up as a sponsor of this build, and provided me with some sick tires.

So without further ado, here's what went into that:

Porsche Backdate Pt 4: New Shoes - FactoryTwoFour

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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-12-2015, 11:44 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #62 (permalink)
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It's been a while since I’ve posted an update - and that time has been full of work! Just compare the last photo in the post above to what my 911 looks like now:



That's right, she's getting ready for paint so everything must go! But before all the panels can go, I had to fit the ’72 RS TRE bodykit. This is a popular option, so I thought I’d talk through how to put all the various pieces on. This post is all about the nitty gritty of the build, but for less in-depth coverage, you can follow the story here: Porsche Backdate Pt 6: Bustin' Ass on Fiberglass | FactoryTwoFour

The TRE kit I bought included:
Ducktail
Rear bumper
Front bumper
Hood
Fender extensions for longhood
Panel mating rubber

Extra Parts You’ll Need:

U-clips
Hood tie downs
3+ inch Bolts
Body screws
Fiberglass and resin
Body sealer

Tools You’ll Need:
Ratchet and sockets
Philips screwdrivers
Welder (or body shop)
Mechanics Wire
Angle grinder and cutting wheel


To kick it off, remove your bumpers front and rear. Also remove the impact bumper posts if you’ve got them (mine is an ’88) – I used a combination of extentions to access the shy bolts on the passenger rear, and moved the washer fluid tank out of the way for the driver’s front.

Then remove your whaletail or decklid. Now that your car is looking suitably punkrock, install your sweet new ducktail! Make sure to do this without the grill. You’ll need to access the inside of the compartment while it is closed. To lock the tail close, you can either use the factory latch, racing tie downs, or both. I went with just tie downs. This fiberglass part, like all fiberglass, will require some love via sandpaper and body filler on both the fiberglass and your metal chassis. Keep massaging the lines until your panel gaps are as small as possible. I continued working on mine after this picture was taken to get that forward gap as small as possible.



All in all, the tail is pretty simple. You’ll spend your time on the sanding and checking over and over till it’s perfect. When it is time to install the grill, I had to grind out square indentations to fit the bolt holders in the grill I got from TRE.

Next you can install the rear bumper. Cut away (or drill out the rivets) of the center light box between taillights. You can choose to leave top section/roof of this box to act as a bracket to screw the fiberglass tail to. I found just welding in 3 small tabs across this area easier, but to each their own!



Grind back all cut metal till smooth. Fit bumper with just your hands and check for alignment and any twisting in the fiberglass part. With an assistant, hold the bumper up and make either the right or left fender edge flush while making sure the center section is as high as possible. Once it is flush on the leading edge and looks good, mark the holes already in the body that used to hold the old heavy bumper. Now that you have marked where the holes go, drill out the fiberglass on those marks on this one side. Mate the pieces together again and pass mechanic’s wire or even a bolt through to hold that corner up temporarily. Move to the other side of the car – once again flush and once again pushed up at the center – and mark the holes. Remove the whole fender again and drill this side.

Once again offer up the fender to the body and connect with temporary measures. You’ll notice that the fiberglass lip width far exceeds of the body’s steel. While that is mostly harmless it will interfere with the reinforcing U-clips you’ll need to protect the fiberglass and the body. Whatever clips you’ve purchased will inform what kind of notch you’ll need to cut out of the fiberglass. Simply mark your required cut around the existing holes all around and remove the bumper again.



Cut out all the tabs, mate it up again, install your U-clips - mine required cutting and customizing my own out of sheet metal to deal with the thickness of the two body pieces -



You can now thread in the screws all around.



At every step ensure your corners are still flush. I let mine sit installed for a week to “bend” everything into shape. If you left the center section of metal or created your own metal tabs to connect the center, drill this out now and connect with body panel screws.

After a week I removed the bumper again and started on the fiberglass patch of the exhaust hole. I did this after the initial fitting process and after “bending” it so as not to stress the patch I created. Create a rough area around the exhaust hole for the fiberglass to adhere to with 80 grit sandpaper on both sides. From the finished and smooth side, lay down one sheet of fiberglass and liberally coat it with resin. Let this single layer dry overnight. You now have a solid backing to layer on. Now from the rough side, layer half circle cuts and build up to flush and even with the existing bumper. Once again, be liberal with the resin. Let this cure and begin sanding. Fill in any gaps or pits with body filler and sand more. Repeat this process until you have a smooth finish that looks invisible.

Moving to the front of the car now, install the fiberglass hood and check for fitment. All gaps should be even from front to back, and the leading edge should be perfectly straight and level. I found my hood to be somewhat bowed upward. To fix this, park the car and hood in the sun for an hour and let it warm up. Next put some weight (35-50 lbs) distributed evenly across where it is bowed. This should flatten it down to even with the fender.

Once you are happy with the hood’s placement, you can move on the front bumper. Suspend the bumper at the level it will be installed by placing wood or cushions underneath it. Some cars will have pre-existing holes that line up with the 4 embedded bolts in the TRE fender. If not, place a nail in both of the top holes and press firmly (or lightly hammer) until you’ve made an impression in the rubberized coating of the front firewall. You can somewhat see the nail in this photo:



Drill out this spot and install a bolt through each into the bumper leaving plenty of wiggle room. Now place a nail in the lower two holes and repeat the process. Level the bumper all around and adjust any holes as necessary. You can now move on to installing the lightbox extensions on the fender.

The lightboxes are now sold by TRE as a very convenient part that can be welded onto your existing short-hood fenders, saving you the thousands it can be to buy replacement fenders. These parts are a great addition to the backdating toolchest, but they are not for beginners (like myself) to install. Despite how simple they look to weld up to the fender, this is generally a job best left to body shops. I attempted it myself and wound up with a massive mismatch between lengths:



Your actual fender must be cut somewhat to accommodate the extensions at the perfect angle and pitch. TRE took care of this job for me, and they’ve been great to work with on all phases of this build. I cannot recommend them enough.



Once they had cut and welded in the extensions, I rechecked the hood and front bumper for fitment and confirmed all was copacetic. And that’s it, the full ’72 RS TRE bodykit was fitted. Before bodyfilling and perfecting, it is on to paint stripping in a major way.

But that’s a story for next time…

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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao

Last edited by AdamKaz; 01-19-2016 at 12:12 PM..
Old 01-19-2016, 12:07 PM
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Great progress and a great update post!

Motivating...
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Old 01-19-2016, 02:28 PM
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2016 update?
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Old 10-13-2016, 04:27 PM
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Oh I got lots...

In paint right now (taking for damn ever!), waiting to share pretty pics
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 10-13-2016, 07:30 PM
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Well it's high time for an update don't you think? I've been pretty good about updating progress monthly or so on FactoryTwoFour, but absolutely garbage about updating the nitty gritty details here. This is supposed to be a step-by-step thread! Let's fix that.

In this long meantime, the car has been stripped of paint, the interior dismantled, doors, glass, and all rubber removed, and sent off to paint for it's coat of Grand Prix White. I had a hell of time finding a local shop to spray the paint for anything less than 20k - even after I'd done all the prep work! It was stripped, patched, cleaned and ready to be sprayed! I did eventually find a quality small shop on the wrong side of town that wasn't focused solely on insurance repair jobs.

They wanted to spray the chassis first, then I'd bring them the doors and fenders, then odds and ends and so on. I thought it was mighty strange that they didn't want to spray everything at once, but as I checked out their previous work and the fact that they were charging me 5k, I rolled with it. And as everything has come back, I'm extremely happy with the quality and consistency. She looks great in white.

So now it's on to reassembly. I returned the engine to its cozy home around back and started on the interior. First up was the headliner as I didn't want to trod all over my new carpet while did that. So while it was still a naked shell I tackled this oft-quoted terrible job. It was actually quite easy. As long as the car is in pieces anyway, the headliner is a breeze. Took me about 3 days (2-3 hours each day) to line it up, stretch it, mock it, then finally glue it in place when I was happy with the placement. I did it alone with no major issues or desire for a helper. This was the first time I felt like it was becoming a real car again.

No stripping or sanding was necessary as the interior floor pan was already at bare metal when I bought it. So a quick vacuum and plucking of any last sound deadener and it was time to install the dynamat. I bought a 911 Carrera specific kit that was perfect, came with everything, and was slightly cheaper than buying everything separate. I applied the small sound deadening panels all around the cabin, then glued thick fabric insulation wall-to-wall all over the cabin. It was rattly as hell when I drove it around previously, shouldn't be a problem anymore.



Before laying carpet, I wanted to mock up my stereo system so the wires would be hidden underneath. It looks like I can hide both my amps (it's an immature stupid-big system I took out my last sportscar) underneath my seats, but that's an assumption since I'm not sticking with stock seats. Here's hoping it works out. So I mocked up the amp placement, ran all the power and sound wires, then removed the amps and laid down the carpet on top to hide all the wires. The carpet kit I got was terrible in the sense that nothing was labeled and there were no instructions. I was left to trying to figure out how some oddly cut piece might wrap around this bend or that. In the end, I'm left with about 5 leftover pieces I have no idea where to put. But the interior is covered...



The last item I've done recently was a custom rear-seat delete. Every delete I've seen has two fatal flaws (IMHO), they are crazy expensive, and the storage area doors open on the side like a glovebox. Having never tried one like this, I can only assume that I would have to tilt the seats forward to access anything. No bueno for a lazy person like myself. The same former sportscar I had that donated its stereo system also gave me a better idea: storage compartments that open from the top rather than side. So I came up with my own over-ambitious design: a fake luggage shelf where the two pieces of luggage act as the door to the storage compartments. Basically the suitcases will be screwed down, and if you open them up they will reveal a little cubby hole. It's great in my head, hopefully it turns out that way when it's done.



I mocked up my idea with cardboard first and finessed all the dimensions, then cut it in very thin wood to further finesse curves and angles, and finally cut it out of 1/2" wood for the final pieces. I decided to use one of the cubbys for my subwoofer, and the other for storage. I made sure the storage cubby to accommodate a full-size takout container should I have a Chinese food craving. I had to estimate the wiggle room required once everything was wrapped in upholstery, but the final fitting worked great now that it's back and wrapped in vinyl.



That's where I'm at for now, pieces are slowly coming back from upholstery, and I'll share pics and details of the finished interior soon.
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-16-2017, 08:39 AM
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hahaha, Amazing secret luggage.
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Old 04-17-2017, 09:08 AM
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Beautiful looking build, closely following it. I've added a link to our Accessories section in case you need any finishing touches. Keep the pictures coming!

Automotive Accessories, Car Covers, Waxes and Polishes, Steering Wheels, Tools and Apparel - Pelican Parts


-Dmitry
Old 04-17-2017, 10:19 AM
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Oh I've been cruising those accessory pages for days picking up little pieces I've forgotten
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-18-2017, 08:25 AM
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I'm upholstering the luggage to match the seats, so it'll look like a factory addition. I'm really hoping it turns out like it is in my head.
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-18-2017, 08:26 AM
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I'm really curious about this luggage...
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Old 04-19-2017, 11:48 AM
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Interior done! The secret luggage compartments came out great, and I rounded them off with some Mexican blankets to add a picnic vibe and to fill up the space left between the luggage and the rear firewall. Of course, you can have your own thoughts but I love it!



I also got the glass installed so I could actually drive it around. Although this did vastly increase the temptation to start driving it before it was officially done, I needed to be able to take to alignment shops, SMOG centers, etc without trailering it everywhere. And about that SMOG shop... This turned into a massive pain the ass that set me back months (thus it's been quiet on this thread for a while), and I covered all the details on my site FactoryTwoFour.



TLDR - I hilariously failed SMOG a whole handful of times and ended up dropping the engine again to find the assumed vacuum leak. Since this is a thread on how to backdate rather than how to be an idiot and chase down a mistake you made, I'll leave the details to the story on the site. Once I got my California SMOG signoff, the car was road legal again and I could start on the endgame.

Since the major mechanical work was done, it was time to apply the "Carrera" vinyl around the bottom of the car. As this is the major gilding on the vehicle and attracts a lot of attention (Hello 70's!) a sane person would have an expert install it, or at the very least watch a Youtube video or two on how to correctly install it. I did none of these things. As is my way, I dove right in and started applying the rear bumper stripes first since 1) they are less detailed than the sides, 2) at the back incase I screw up and 3) the shortest sections. Careful measuring and a light touch actually makes this a pretty simple job. I moved on the front, and then the finicky sides by lining up the vinyl (still on it's paper backing) with masking tape to ensure placement, then peeling the paper away and sticking it down.

The car actually looks real now. It completely freaked me out to step back and see my dream car, the car I've been fantasizing about for 10+ years suddenly in my garage. The Carrera stripes changed the entire car and really brought home that I'm just about done with this build...




I also got in my seats from Stefan at GTS Classics in TX. They were pricey, but he was a gem to deal with, added some custom touches to my seats (we mated my car's power adjustments to his classic seat pan), and shipped them out to me with care. They match the luggage and bring the whole interior together. Much better than the temporary beige seats I was using:




With a done looking car, it was time for an alignment and corner balance. I went to Mistress of Silverlake CA as they are renowned in the local community for their alignments. Again, pricey (Porsche tax!) but they did a great job and car felt completely transformed from how I drove it to them. Gone was the nervous nature and flighty steering, replaced by a solid car that tracked true and didn't dart around with every pot hole.

So my Porsche looks good, is legal, and drives like it should. What's left? Well a few last touches and tracking down some nagging problems you only find when it's all together and you start using it. Next time, finishing touches and the conclusion of this build.
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-22-2018, 07:57 AM
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Nice work.

MattR
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Old 04-22-2018, 08:17 AM
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I love a good hidden sub! You're not afraid the lids will flap up on-beat?
Old 04-22-2018, 02:07 PM
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Very nice build.

Considering your original budget of $10K, how did you make out?
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Old 04-22-2018, 08:01 PM
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Oh man, I need to total it up in the next 30 days and it's going to be ugly. I blew past 10k more than a year ago. Currently thinking 20k, but I'll know soon.

My original budget was 10k AND 1yr...
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"The Rain" 1988 911 Carrera Coupe
"The Dog" 1970 BMW 2002
"The Saint" 2012 BMW G650 GS Sertao
Old 04-23-2018, 09:19 AM
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She's a beauty Adam,

Well played!
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:34 AM
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Very nice Adam
thank you for sharing your build

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Old 04-23-2018, 12:38 PM
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