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Introducing my rebuildable piston squirter!

Hi Guys,

I have hinted at this before, but I couldn't talk about it due to the fact that I was getting the device patented. Finally, my attorney has filed and my squirter (among a half dozen other air cooled Porsche inventions) is filed. We did an exhaustive search, and nothing exists like this anywhere.

What I have to show you is my rebuildable piston squirter - this model is for retrofit to existing Porsche 911 cases. One of my other patents integrates the squirter assembly right into the case itself, which is the ideal solution, but this one here works basically as good.

THE PROBLEM
I have rebuilt many Porsche engines and I am convinced Porsche never really gave much thought to rebuilding the motors. They are a new car company; I get it. But how many of these squirters are inoperative when you go to rebuild? How many don't really pass the compressed air test? How can you really know if the insides of the squirter barrels are clean, and free of any debris?

That's a lot of questions. Too many for my liking. I got sick thinking of not being able to access the insides of the squirters when building a really expensive motor, so I decided to fix it.

My requirements were as follows:
1. I did not want to have to tap the case or modify the case in any way. Whereas I am very comfortable modifying the case, I wanted to cater to the lowest level of home mechanic.

2. I needed to get at the complete inside of the squirter barrel so I could visually see what was inside.

3. I wanted to be able to rebuild the squirter without removing the barrel from the case.

4. I wanted the same performance as stock - meaning, leave the check valve in there to preserve idle oil pressure.

What I achieved was a steel barrel which is a light press fit into the case. This barrel has a cap, and the insides of the barrel contain the spring and the ball, just like stock.

The advantages of my squirter over a stock one are:
- ability to change the orifice size on the cap on the fly for more or less flow
- completely rebuildable and inspectable
- much easier to install than a stock unit

Which brings me to my next point. What is holding this thing in the case. I already know I am going to get many people who doubt the adhesive, but I am 100% comfortable with it.

The adhesive in question is Loctite 640, and its properties for adhering cylindrical bodies together are legendary. Take a look at the spec sheet for this product and you'll see that it was tested for over 1000 hours in a bath of engine oil at 250 degrees and it did not lose an iota of strength.

Staking these things is not necessary; the factory did it because they were paranoid. In fact, a press fit is not necessary either, but I recommend it as an added, if unneeded measure of safety.

Lastly, we come to orifice sizing. Stock sizes are as follows:

911 - 1.0mm
930 - 1.5mm
964 - 2.0mm

Because the internal dimensions of my squirters are different than stock, my orifice sizing needs to go up 1/2mm to ensure the same flow as stock. Don't worry, this was all extensively tested.

So my recommended sizes are:

911 - 1.5mm
930 - 2.0mm
964 - 2.5mm

Also, note that there are two barrel diameters available, just like stock. 6.0mm is the one you want if your squirter bores are real nice. If you buggered up your squirter hole, we make a 6.6mm oversize just like the factory.

Prices are $45 each, which includes the barrel, cap, spring, and ball. You'll be able to order them off my site soon, until then drop me a PM.

Oh, and here is a video that explains the installation much better than this wall of text!



Let me know what you guys think!
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Current: 1970 914-6 conversion 2.7, 1973 T, 1975 930 Turbo Targa, 1978 928 Race car, 6.57L, 1983 911SC, 1987 928S4 5 speed, 2002 911 Targa, 2007 997TT, 2009 997TT, 2004 40th Anniversary Carrera

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Old 12-18-2017, 12:53 PM
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I, for one, am glad to see continuous improvement of our existing aircooled Porsche components. This obviously has applications in any other engine that has oil squirters. Awesome concept!
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Old 12-18-2017, 03:57 PM
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Thank you!

In fact the patent was drafted by a really sharp automotive patent attorney and it was worded for ANY internal combustion engine, not just Porsche.

Good catch!
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Current: 1970 914-6 conversion 2.7, 1973 T, 1975 930 Turbo Targa, 1978 928 Race car, 6.57L, 1983 911SC, 1987 928S4 5 speed, 2002 911 Targa, 2007 997TT, 2009 997TT, 2004 40th Anniversary Carrera

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Old 12-18-2017, 04:22 PM
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Hey, nice marmot.
 
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I was just reading about your squirters the orher day in the engine building forum. Looks like a great product and solution.

Congrats on getting the patent process started!

Great video too.
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:09 PM
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Hey, nice marmot.
 
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One thought. You should think about a way to affix a label to the case that identifies your squirters are installed and your website for spare parts. Or some way to make your squirters readily identifiable. It’s likely that anyone performing future maintenance won’t know that the squirters can be serviced (assume they are OEM) and just drill them out.
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'83 911 SC 3.0 coupe (NA)

You can't buy happiness, but you can buy car parts which is kind of the same thing.

Last edited by tirwin; 12-18-2017 at 06:41 PM..
Old 12-18-2017, 06:15 PM
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That's a pretty slick solution. I like it.

Can I ask a few easy questions?

In the video, you use a significant amount of Loctite 640 and mention that it only cures in the absence of air. It still makes me uncomfortable to think of that much bonding agent dripping down into the squirter bore and inside the squirter itself when used on the screw cap. Is my concern completely misguided and due to me not understanding the properties of Loctite 640? Does the excess just get washed out thru the squirter during the first start-up? Is it a potential issue if the engine sits for an extended period before being run?

On the sizing choices: the original squirters I removed from my 2.7L case measure 6.27mm. The replacements I received from the machine shop (which look like stock but are of their own making I was told) measure 6.37mm. I don't want to jinx myself, but the 3 I have removed so far, came out super cleanly and left the bores in really great shape. Will your standard sized 5.95mm barrels work? Your video mentions using a 6.4mm drill bit for the oversized barrels - what drill bit could I use as a gauge for 5.95mm barrels?

Thanks for developing what looks to be a great solution.

Tom
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:44 PM
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This is awesome.
Old 12-19-2017, 05:48 AM
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Very cool!

Didn't see the video yet. Do you apply any thread locker to the cap so it doesn't unscrew with use down the road?
Old 12-19-2017, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tirwin View Post
One thought. You should think about a way to affix a label to the case that identifies your squirters are installed and your website for spare parts. Or some way to make your squirters readily identifiable. Itís likely that anyone performing future maintenance wonít know that the squirters can be serviced (assume they are OEM) and just drill them out.
True, but the squirters are made of steel, and they won't (easily) drill out like the stock ones. EXCELLENT idea though....I have to get on that.
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Current: 1970 914-6 conversion 2.7, 1973 T, 1975 930 Turbo Targa, 1978 928 Race car, 6.57L, 1983 911SC, 1987 928S4 5 speed, 2002 911 Targa, 2007 997TT, 2009 997TT, 2004 40th Anniversary Carrera

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Old 12-19-2017, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom '74 911 View Post
That's a pretty slick solution. I like it.

Can I ask a few easy questions?

In the video, you use a significant amount of Loctite 640 and mention that it only cures in the absence of air. It still makes me uncomfortable to think of that much bonding agent dripping down into the squirter bore and inside the squirter itself when used on the screw cap. Is my concern completely misguided and due to me not understanding the properties of Loctite 640? Does the excess just get washed out thru the squirter during the first start-up? Is it a potential issue if the engine sits for an extended period before being run?

Tom
I have had this concern as well. In fact, the instructions (the printed ones I am making) will have a diagram that shows exactly where to put the loctite. So I ran some tests - a lot of tests. I installed a couple squirters super sloppy, gooping the loctite on without a care. I really wanted to cater to the lowest level of installer.

After I ran the motor and then tore it down, ALL squirters were functional, even the ones with the loctite on sloppy.

However, I discovered where a problem might occur if the loctite was on too thick - INSIDE THE BARREL. It never happened, but it could. Basically, if you put the loctite on super thick on the cap, and it drips inside the barrel, it could sink down into where the ball is seated and jam the ball in place.

Note that this is a THEORY, and it never happened no matter how thick I put the 640 on, but it is enough of a concern to me to ensure the printed instructions clearly state the 640 needs to be placed UNDER THE CAP and a little on the threads, not just on the threads.

More specifically, 640 is just like 574. It won't dry in air no matter how long you let it sit. Even weeks later. So there is no danger of it hardening in your oil galleries.

Even so, if you are concerned, here is what you do: Install the squirters per the vid on an unbuilt case half. Let them cure 24 hours. Soak the passages with carb cleaner, and blow the squirters out. Now they will sit indefinitely without your intervention until you are ready to build the motor.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom '74 911 View Post

On the sizing choices: the original squirters I removed from my 2.7L case measure 6.27mm. The replacements I received from the machine shop (which look like stock but are of their own making I was told) measure 6.37mm. I don't want to jinx myself, but the 3 I have removed so far, came out super cleanly and left the bores in really great shape. Will your standard sized 5.95mm barrels work? Your video mentions using a 6.4mm drill bit for the oversized barrels - what drill bit could I use as a gauge for 5.95mm barrels?

Thanks for developing what looks to be a great solution.

Tom
It is REALLY important when using Loctite 640 to ensure that the bores are either a light press fit or have a maximum gap, which is like .05-.08mm. Any larger of a gap and you risk failure of the Loctite, and that goes for STOCK squirters as well. Remember, Porsche specs Loctite 640 for stock squirters.

640 works best when applied very thin!

If your bores are about 6.27mm, I would not put a 5.95mm squirter in there. That is too big a gap. Run a 6.4mm bit through there and go oversize. It'll take less than 5 mins to do them all.

Also if your hole is 6.27 and your squirter is 6.37 you will have a hard time hammering the stock ones in, as they will want to deform if you aren't doing it right, which is another thing I hate about stock squirters!
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Current: 1970 914-6 conversion 2.7, 1973 T, 1975 930 Turbo Targa, 1978 928 Race car, 6.57L, 1983 911SC, 1987 928S4 5 speed, 2002 911 Targa, 2007 997TT, 2009 997TT, 2004 40th Anniversary Carrera

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Old 12-19-2017, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by bpu699 View Post
Very cool!

Didn't see the video yet. Do you apply any thread locker to the cap so it doesn't unscrew with use down the road?
Bo, you of all people (Mr. Oil Pressure) need to watch the video!
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Only reproduction 3.6 cases on the planet, coming soon www.taorminaracingdesigns.com
Old 12-19-2017, 07:30 AM
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Thanks for your responses. I will send you a PM w/my email to see about purchasing a set.

Thanks,
Tom
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Old 12-19-2017, 09:05 AM
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Excellent new product........

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catorce View Post
Hi Guys,




Catorce,

This is a well conceived and designed product. I will have these on my next engine rebuild. Have you thought or considered in your development stages to have part #1 threaded from the outside? And part #4 hexagonal instead of a round disc? Why?

It would be catastrophic if part #4 would come off. But if there is a second mechanical safety feature like the metal locking tabs used for the oil pump nuts would give you some extra confidence. I am sure you would not install the oil pump nuts without the proper metal locking tabs.

BTW, where are you located? Consider me another future customer. What is the best way to contact you. Thanks.

Tony
Old 12-19-2017, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boyt911sc View Post
Catorce,

This is a well conceived and designed product. I will have these on my next engine rebuild. Have you thought or considered in your development stages to have part #1 threaded from the outside? And part #4 hexagonal instead of a round disc? Why?

It would be catastrophic if part #4 would come off. But if there is a second mechanical safety feature like the metal locking tabs used for the oil pump nuts would give you some extra confidence. I am sure you would not install the oil pump nuts without the proper metal locking tabs.

BTW, where are you located? Consider me another future customer. What is the best way to contact you. Thanks.

Tony
Thanks Tony,

I am in SoCal. The patent itself includes hex head versions as well as threaded barrels, but honestly they are not required. I ran the prototype set for 500 hard miles and let me tell you, the caps were a BEAR to remove even with the right heat. You just have to trust the adhesive, and I did a lot of homework and even talked to Henkel repeatedly on the design.

Henkel was given a copy of the engineering drawings and approved the use of 640 for this application. You should see the stuff that people use 640 for....it is primarily a bearing adhesive and it works a lot harder in those applications than it ever would on mine.

Thanks for your interest!

Adam - adam@taorminaracingdesigns.com
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Current: 1970 914-6 conversion 2.7, 1973 T, 1975 930 Turbo Targa, 1978 928 Race car, 6.57L, 1983 911SC, 1987 928S4 5 speed, 2002 911 Targa, 2007 997TT, 2009 997TT, 2004 40th Anniversary Carrera

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Old 12-19-2017, 10:44 AM
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Hi Catorce,
what's the difference in Your design that requires an orifice larger than the equivalent OEM part? The concept looks pretty straightforward to me.
thanks
luca
Old 12-19-2017, 09:43 PM
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Hi Adam,

Love this, really neat piece of engineering. If only I'd have known about them 4-5wks ago!!

Agree with the 640 and not making it an overly tight fit into the web; iirc, Loctite do specify a minimum clearance don't they? i.e., to ensure that the 640 doesn't get wiped straight off when installing into a press fit scenario.

One Q: with the home mechanic in mind, and thinking at the most unlikely scenario (maybe), would it be sufficient to use blue 242 for the cap fixing (#4)? I'm thinking that it would be quite possible for somebody to over-do the heat to remove the cap and also soften the 640 holding the barrel into the case, ending up with a spinning and/or a partially removed barrel. It would also allow cleaning of the internal thread to be easier (assuming a diligent blowing through with cleaners and air).

But well done, like it [thumbsup]

Spencer.

ETA: Do the turbo motors use a different orifice squirter than the n/a motors, to maybe spray more cooling oil under a hotter piston? (thinking specifically the 964 Turbo, selfishly)
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Last edited by Spenny_b; 12-20-2017 at 01:53 AM..
Old 12-20-2017, 01:50 AM
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Spencer,

Wow, that is a very astute observation and one that I personally struggle with! So I asked Henkel about the whole assembly, and they saw the drawings for the whole thing early on. They recommended that the cap be attached with 640, because then, they would consider it a "permanent" installation.

I wanted that because lets face it, outside of racers, the average guy is going to build a motor and run it 80,000 miles. So i felt the caps should therefore be permanent.

So in my teardown I removed all the caps just to see how it went. The video shortens the heating process obviously because its boring to watch me use a torch....but here is what I observed:

1. It takes a lot of heat DIRECTLY APPLIED to remove the cap.
2. Using a digital thermometer, even the metal located a half inch away is notably cooler, and not hot enough to break the bond.
3. When the 640 fails, it burns up, leaving no residue so to speak.

From these experiments, which are somewhat empirical, I came to the conclusion that the light press fit that I am recommending coupled with the fact that the 640 down at the base of the squirter barrel isn't hot enough to fail will keep the squirter in nicely.

The stuff is really tenacious to the point where if you put a screwdriver on the cap without heating it, you will destroy the cap before the loctite fails (an actual experiment of mine). I would also wager that the light press fit alone would keep the squirter barrel seated.

Our motors just don't run that hot.....

As to the 964 orifice, it is a 2.5mm; the regular 964 got the same orifice.

Great questions!
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Only reproduction 3.6 cases on the planet, coming soon www.taorminaracingdesigns.com
Old 12-20-2017, 07:21 AM
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fantastic
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Old 12-21-2017, 12:24 AM
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Catorce

My understanding is the 993 turbo squirters were different then the others by flowing more via a larger orifice. How do your squirters flow compaired to the turbo versions? When will these be available for purchase?

I think you have a great product. Just about every other engine I have worked on had removable squirters that you can get into and clean if needed. It always bothered me about the 911 squirters and how flakey the testing can be when doing a rebuild.
Old 12-21-2017, 07:10 AM
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Very cool. When will they be available?

regards,
al
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Old 12-21-2017, 07:28 AM
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