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Shaun @ Tru6's Avatar
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Andrew View Post
Very nice work, indeed.I wish I had a set that I could send you.
Considering these are sand castings, the anodizing turned out exceptionally well and appears to hide the surface irregularities superbly. Type II or hardcoat? Hard to tell from the photos.
Mike, these were done with a proprietary military chemistry used on a certain black helicopter.

The very foundation of Tru6 is surface prep. Honestly, that is 90% of what I do and specialize in. In this case, these were both mechanically and chemically polished to create the best possible surface for anodizing. The combination of the anodizing and prep, these are nicer than factory new.

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Old 01-24-2019, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTL View Post
Fantastic work by Shaun once again! Both sets of calipers look fantabulous!!!!

Do the pistons typically need much tumbling or polishing? Their anodized surface is usually very resistant to attack, as long as nobody has mangled them like this

The rule of thumb for the piston steps is they are oriented to be perpendicular to the rotor. If you were to draw an arrow in the direction of forward travel around the rotor, the arrow should hit the step perpendicular. On the Ate calipers it's 20 that gets the piston in the right position

However, on the 930 calipers the steps can be aligned parallel with the edge of the pad box. Just make sure you point the steps to face the direction of travel. That means on the front calipers the steps point up (calipers are mounted in front of the axle) and the rear caliper has the steps facing down because 930s have the calipers mounted behind the axle.


The purpose of the step is to reduce tapered pad wear. Apparently the step allows pad outgassing without the pad coming off the face of the rotor. Without the step the pad tilts away from the rotor face and you get tapered pad wear. It's not insignificant pad wear either. It's actually very substantial if the brakes are used hard like on the track. Later calipers on other cars like the 944 Turbo, 928 S4, 944S2, 964, etc. that have calipers with different sized pistons accomplish the same thing without the need for stepped pistons. The differing piston diameters take the place of the stepped pistons.

Keep up the great work Shaun. Very impressive level of detail and beautiful results.

Thank you Kevin!

Those are ugly, ouch, I've never seen anything like that. I like to polish things so I do any chance I can. These pistons were all in good shape but I feel like they get "freshened" being in the tumbler (no abrasive media) for a bit.

Great info on the piston steps, thanks.

On orientation, I went by the original pieces, this link Tech Article: 930 Brakes and the manual. Reading the tech article, it says the step is to reduce heat transfer from the pad to the piston. Must be fun to be an engineer and think of things like that, and what you say, when desiging something.
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Old 01-24-2019, 11:54 AM
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Proper restore. Great photo's.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:02 PM
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This is some more very impressive work by Tru6. We don’t do much micro-restoration like this, but I can’t wait to see what my little Dino mirrors look like when Shaun is done having them plated! The calipers are amazing. - Matt
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:46 PM
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fantastic work...

shaun whats the going rate to restore 930 calipers? i have a couple of set that may need to be redone
Old 01-29-2019, 05:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun @ Tru6 View Post

mucho want!!!
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Old 01-29-2019, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by panzerfaust View Post
fantastic work...

shaun whats the going rate to restore 930 calipers? i have a couple of set that may need to be redone
Thank you!

$900 per pair. More than PMB but I think worth the extra $101.
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Old 01-29-2019, 05:43 AM
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Absolutely spectacular work Shaun.....thank you for putting a price out there.

This will be number 1 on my wish list for a Santa Stocking Stuffer this year......nice to have a target.

Approx turn around time?

Scott
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Old 01-29-2019, 05:55 AM
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Thanks Scott! Figure 2-3 week turnaround time. That can easily go to 4 but a good estimate.
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Old 01-29-2019, 06:07 AM
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Shaun, were did you buy your banjos?
Thanks
Bill K
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:33 AM
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Hey Bill, those came with the calipers. I tumbled them and then polished them.
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:34 AM
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That's what I what I was afraid of.
Both my sets (on two cars) came without.
You should see how the resulting brake lines (home-made) look.

Bill K
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:55 AM
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Quote:
Geronimo
32C Member #41
Geronimo, do you mean THIS 32C? I do not recall getting a member #.
sadly I sold it last year, hated to but needed funds for my 930 project.



Quote:
were did you buy your banjos?
I had to get new banjos / hollow bolts as the set I obtained only had ONE. and it turns out those crossover tube are NLA, so will have to make some. got the banjos but got the wrong hollow bolts, waiting on the correct ones.

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Old 01-29-2019, 11:16 AM
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To reinforce the near-originality that you're getting with a restoration like Shaun's, here's a picture of a new 930 Brembo caliper. They don't make them the same as they used to. New ones come with white zinc fasteners and the anodizing is a shade of purple, not true black.



Bill K,

If you're making your own brake lines regularly, the hot setup i've found is to use the very nice cunifer tubing and a quality flaring tool. Belmetric has quality cohline tube nuts and the cunifer tubing. The cunifer is SO nice because its corrosion resistant and so agreeable to bending.

I have the Eastwood turret style tool (unfortunately just one more example of someone copying and Chinese-ing the original brilliant tool, which I believe was made by Sykes Pickavant) and it makes excellent flares every time. The only issue i've found, and it's a minor one, is the resulting opening in the end of the line is too small. So I open up the hole with a small file after flaring (and clear out the debris with brake parts cleaner) to make it the same size as the tubing ID prior to flaring it.

Here's a basic line I made to fit the 930 caliper to my strut. Looks just like the original you can buy from Porsche. However I also recognize that new OEM Porsche brake lines like these are very affordable. A new line like the one I made myself is currently like $13.




But I also made some very long lines on my '86 Carrera in the front that would have been very expensive to buy. These were the lines that come from the tee near the steering rack and connect with the soft lines at the struts. Anyhow, I feel like the quality flaring tool pays for itself very quickly. Other split bar flaring tools are junk and are to be avoided. They are very inconsistent at making uniform flares and are basically dangerous in my mind when it comes to something important like brakes.
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Old 01-29-2019, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun @ Tru6 View Post
Thank you!

$900 per pair. More than PMB but I think worth the extra $101.
thanks for the quick reply..
Old 01-30-2019, 05:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KTL View Post
To reinforce the near-originality that you're getting with a restoration like Shaun's, here's a picture of a new 930 Brembo caliper. They don't make them the same as they used to. New ones come with white zinc fasteners and the anodizing is a shade of purple, not true black.



Bill K,

If you're making your own brake lines regularly, the hot setup i've found is to use the very nice cunifer tubing and a quality flaring tool. Belmetric has quality cohline tube nuts and the cunifer tubing. The cunifer is SO nice because its corrosion resistant and so agreeable to bending.

I have the Eastwood turret style tool (unfortunately just one more example of someone copying and Chinese-ing the original brilliant tool, which I believe was made by Sykes Pickavant) and it makes excellent flares every time. The only issue i've found, and it's a minor one, is the resulting opening in the end of the line is too small. So I open up the hole with a small file after flaring (and clear out the debris with brake parts cleaner) to make it the same size as the tubing ID prior to flaring it.

Here's a basic line I made to fit the 930 caliper to my strut. Looks just like the original you can buy from Porsche. However I also recognize that new OEM Porsche brake lines like these are very affordable. A new line like the one I made myself is currently like $13.




But I also made some very long lines on my '86 Carrera in the front that would have been very expensive to buy. These were the lines that come from the tee near the steering rack and connect with the soft lines at the struts. Anyhow, I feel like the quality flaring tool pays for itself very quickly. Other split bar flaring tools are junk and are to be avoided. They are very inconsistent at making uniform flares and are basically dangerous in my mind when it comes to something important like brakes.

nice work on the lines Kevin. There is a good reason to make your own over buying new. New have an extremely durable green coating on them. Fine for most cars but not for anything that will be shown or someone wants "off the assembly line" originality. I've stripped and replated a lot of these lines...have stripped and plate a lot of brand new Porsche parts for customers since the plating is either the wrong color or is just plain ugly. Fan straps are hideous from Porsche. Same with spring plate covers, etc.


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Old 01-30-2019, 05:05 AM
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KNS KNS is offline
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Those are so much more beautiful than slathering red or yellow paint on them.
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Old 01-30-2019, 06:11 AM
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put new seals in mine, the inside ones.
had problems getting the pistons back in.
contacted brembo about it. they sent me a part number for soaking the seals.

did you actually pout grease on the pistons/seals
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Old 01-30-2019, 06:28 AM
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Old 01-30-2019, 06:30 AM
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So nice!
I feel bad for having shaved off some fins on my rear calipers....
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Old 01-30-2019, 07:46 AM
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