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Kartoffelkopf
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat RUFBTR View Post
Hi, good to read you Spencer again!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeffries
Spenny, good to hear from you. Sorry that I don't have anything illuminating to say other than Hi and keep up the good work.

John
Hi Pat, hi John,

Thank you both! Yep, it's always nice to get back onto the project after a period of inactivity. Sometimes you just need a break from it and to "do other stuff" to get the passion back again.

@John - I've been missing your project updates, apologies - I assumed it was equally quiet but upon checking my subscription settings I found that I didn't have active notifications set....lots of catching up for me to do!!)

Cheers
S


Last edited by Spenny_b; 03-10-2020 at 01:58 AM..
Old 03-10-2020, 01:50 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1241 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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A quick couple of photos of the new H&R anti-rollbars in their resplendent mauve (?!?)....





I heard form Chris last night, most of the parts are now on their way. Going with Tarett rear drop links for the ARB, the Elephant ones are out of stock, but actually I think the Tarett ones look more serviceable, with screws that hold the drop link into the mount, versus what look to be roll-pins on the ER items? Maybe an old photo of the ER ones on their website, but either way I think the Tarett ones are also highly regarded.

The bump-steer corrective arms for the steering rack are still about 10 days away; once Chris has everything, they'll be winging their way over. Very exciting, I've been planning this and creating mental shopping lists for years!

The chap who previously did all of my vapour blasting on the engine build (intake manifold, oil pump drive casings, etc) is still in business, and was great to reacquaint myself with him again yesterday, lovely guy. The suspension arms will all be going to him as soon as they're off and stripped.

Still undecided on the home plating kit though....hmmmm....
Old 03-10-2020, 05:14 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1242 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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Time for another update.....

My bar of Nylatron, 102mm diameter, arrived the other day which is what I needed to make the seating rings for the rear dampers.

Quick recap - installing the dampers and springs onto the Elephant Racing monoball top mounts means that you don't use the purple ally perch, as supplied by KW...



...I guess these interface nicely into the stock top mounts.

However, substituting the OE mounts for the ER ones, this is what you get...





As you can see, the studs which are installed are pressed in but sit proud of the mount body. I don't know why they don't counterbore them and install flush, but there you go. I was told that what you see in the above photo is how they're supposed to be, and that it would be fine. I wasn't happy with only 3 points of contact for the spring, and a loose fit of the spring over the bearing housing. Steel against aluminium also niggled me, the lovely anodised finish eventually being damaged.

So, time to correct both of those annoyances and do a proper job. The Nylatron I ordered this time was some that had MoS2 (molybdenum disulphide) added to it which apparently makes it stiffer, harder and dimensionally more stable than standard Nylatron. As it happens, it was the only option available for that diameter, in the (short) length I needed, at a reasonable price and in a couple of days. But, it's nowhere near as nice to turn as the regular Nylatron. Regular material chips nicely and easily gives a lovely surface finish; this material doesn't chip, in some regards it's very plastic so it tangles around the tool and onto the work itself....but then (unlike normal nylon) it's very tough to get off and untangle. Once you get a feel for how to cut the material you can get a decent surface finish, but it's not as forgiving as regular Nylatron.

Anyway, onto what I've now made.....



Today I also realised that I have a very limited selection of milling cutters - in fact, just one end mill and it's not the same, or larger, diameter that I needed to mill the escutcheons to clear the stud bases. So, I had to instead machine a square-ish section from each location. Nothing critical dimensionally, so long as the recesses are deep enough...





Each one of these sleeves is a spot-on fit onto the top mounts...



...the spring is now sitting on a full 360ļ surface contact base, and is held concentrically a lot tighter to the mount....





And that sums up this evenings work. In other news, I received one of the bearing/seal installation kits. I should be receiving the bush removal kit tomorrow. Between them I'm hoping I've got all situations covered for this project and other work, like the Lotus suspension, which will be overhauled next winter after the house project is done.
Old 03-13-2020, 03:16 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1243 (permalink)
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Not too much to report from the last week or so, other than to we're now underway with the teardown....ripped the plaster, committed to doing it, no going back now.

Starting with the right-rear corner, fairly straightforward although when you do the first attempt at anything, it does take a lot longer than the next corner....finding the "knack", assembling the right combination of tools, etc.



Best tool in the garage? The flipping long 3/4" drive breaker bar! That's been invaluable, along with the Snap On torque multiplier I bought a few years ago. The rear arm is almost ready to come off; the driveshaft is now out, the brakes came off the other evening along with the hub. The outboard chassis fixing of the rear arm was exceptionally tight and definitely a single-hex 18mm socket only. The inboard spring plate pivot bolt was also a challenge, not really because of how tight it was, just the sheer lack of space between it and the transmission casing. The left hand side looks a lot easier, far more space. I bought a shallow set of hex keys to do this, and although the size I needed had only a 3/8" sq drive, with the breaker bar and a trolley jack handle on it, it did come undone. How I torque it back up, I don't yet know.

When removing the hub, the wheel bearing came apart, leaving the outer race on the shaft of the hub. From what I've read, it seems it does in most cases. It confirmed my decision to replace all the wheel bearings regardless (although I think they may have been done by a PO, evidence of copper slip rather than Alu Slip, not factory). The grease inside the bearing is very hard and wax-like, although there were no signs of imminent failure.



My policy of buying lots of tools (mostly because I love buying tools...) has paid off, with a bearing removal tool that I must've bought a long time ago and never used, coming into play to remove the outer case of the bearing from the hub.

The biggest headache at the moment is trying to remove the handbrake cable. It's disassembled from the brake shoes, the plates removed leaving just the cable and attachment eyes...but the ferrule that inserts into the back of the suspension arm just will not budge. I've sprayed penetrating fluid on it for the last few evenings, and then removed the driveshaft late last night - that will allow greater access to maybe get some molegrips onto the ferrule (the cable is recessed into the Turbo arms, whereas it isn't on the Carrera arms)

Before I remove the arm from the chassis, I'll loosen the spring plate bolts. I also placed the order for the replacement parts today...all reassuringly expensive, but I absolutely wanted to buy original Porsche wheel bearings rather than aftermarket. Same for the front lower balljoints, OE all the way. My meagre 13 row shopping list is almost £900 with the VAT!! By comparison, when I added up how much it would be to replace every nut, bolt and washer as well, the total would have been £1800.

Back again when there's some more interesting progress being made.
Old 03-23-2020, 10:45 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1244 (permalink)
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Ms. Merkel and the entire German Economy thank you for your purchase and investment, Sir.

BYW, I just rebuilt the torque tube from my 924S ("Yes, it's an S! Not an Audi engined POS", said the defensive owner. "It's also faster than a 944 because it slimmer...and more pure!" "It's the next 73RS....Hagerty put it on their Buy list") Where was I? Ball Bearings! I needed four bearings and Porsche AG doesn't sell them; I bought SKF items, made in Argentina. "Better than the Chinese $hit", said the guy at the excellent old-skool bearing supplier, EB Atmus, in Springfield, Massachusetts. So you, Sir Spencer, are a man of the world...why buy bearings from Porsche? Is the assumption that, like Glyco bearings being available both on the open market and via Porsche, that those Porsche sells have all been through QC and are the pick of the litter...same with your bearings?

Hope you're well and keeping the Plague at bay. John
Old 03-24-2020, 06:13 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1245 (permalink)
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Spenny, I'm sure I'm being thick; what spring plate bolts are there on a 964? I thought 964 did away with torsion bars and spring plates.

Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk
Old 03-25-2020, 05:12 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1246 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mixed76 View Post
Spenny, I'm sure I'm being thick; what spring plate bolts are there on a 964? I thought 964 did away with torsion bars and spring plates.

Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk
Hi, sure, no problem - I don't think technically they are "spring" plates, more alignment plates used for setting camber and toe. But they look similar to the 930/pre-964 setup.



You can see the large inboard pivot on the left - this gets removed and replaced with the Elephant Racing monoball kit. The other fixings are eccentrics and slotted alignment adjustments with 2x locking bolts. All needs removing, rubber bush removed, plates replated, then rebuilt.

Which poses another challenge - I need to speak to my plating shop and see if they're still working (doubtful). I also doubt whether any of the suppliers of home plating kits are sending stuff out either. Bugger.
Old 03-26-2020, 02:54 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1247 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeffries View Post
Ms. Merkel and the entire German Economy thank you for your purchase and investment, Sir.

BYW, I just rebuilt the torque tube from my 924S ("Yes, it's an S! Not an Audi engined POS", said the defensive owner. "It's also faster than a 944 because it slimmer...and more pure!" "It's the next 73RS....Hagerty put it on their Buy list") Where was I? Ball Bearings! I needed four bearings and Porsche AG doesn't sell them; I bought SKF items, made in Argentina. "Better than the Chinese $hit", said the guy at the excellent old-skool bearing supplier, EB Atmus, in Springfield, Massachusetts. So you, Sir Spencer, are a man of the world...why buy bearings from Porsche? Is the assumption that, like Glyco bearings being available both on the open market and via Porsche, that those Porsche sells have all been through QC and are the pick of the litter...same with your bearings?

Hope you're well and keeping the Plague at bay. John
Hey John!

Yeah all's well here thanks, self isolating and cracking on, chin up.

Yeah, you hit the nail on the head with the Glyco analogy. I have it on extremely good authority (you know who you are!) that when I was having the transmission rebuilt, the bearings are available aftermarket, by the same manufacturer who supply Porsche. Said person, on their transmission, did go with the aftermarket version but very soon was bitten by one failing. Rebuild time all-over-again. Upon further investigation he found that the Porsche supplied items undergo FAR higher quality control than the part supplied directly. Admittedly at a far cheaper price, but it's the numerous levels of QC that the manufacturer is contracted to undertake, that you're paying for.

So...yes, they are maybe half the price, but in the whole scheme of things versus how much the suspension project is costing, it's a relatively small percentage. I'm not into doing things twice; did that with the engine! Of course, the other factor is whether you can even source non Porsche stuff at the moment - everywhere is shutting down; I just heard a few minutes ago that I did just about sneak my order through in time, and it's arrived at my OPC. Hoping to now get it couriered across.
Old 03-26-2020, 03:02 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1248 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Spenny_b View Post
Hi Ian,

Thanks, yes, I had read about the bolt diameters, and from what I gather, KW have (somewhat begrudgingly) supplied sleeves to accommodate the difference. Worst case, I'll spin up some sleeves out of stainless on my lathe

If you are able to send across some pics, that'd be super useful, thanks; the Rennline setup is perhaps more relevant, as I'd like to see how the tops of the springs interface with the top mounts. Thanks!
Sorry for the delay spencer .
I only just realized when I saw this thread again today .
I just snapped some pics of the fronts , but it looks like you made your own solution now ?
They have a small spacer (4-5mm) between the top hat and the monoball .
No sticktion there whatsoever .

If you need more , let me know .
( Iím subscribing , so Iíll get notification of replies )







Old 03-27-2020, 04:27 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1249 (permalink)
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Here are pics of a euro rs top-mount .
Same thing .







Old 03-27-2020, 06:13 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1250 (permalink)
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Time for another update....

First off, most of the shopping list I ordered from Porsche Tonbridge have actually arrived....and at this point I need to say a couple of big "thank you's"....

Firstly to Chris (TK); I mentioned to him in a WA message that I didn't think I had quite got my parts ordered in time, as Tonbridge called me on Tuesday morning to say that they had taken the decision to close the dealership to the public - so near and yet so far. Without me even asking him, he proactively put a call in to his local OPC to investigate price and availability in case Plan B would be to order them in the US and then ship over with the Elephant Racing parts. What a great guy.

Secondly, thanks to Dan at OPC Tonbridge, who was fielding all the phonecalls that were diverted to him working from home. He had a sneaky suspicion that my parts would be arriving with the skeleton staff still in the dealership, but would go in on Thursday to make sure. He then called me back with a plan of action; everyone would be given a 20min time slot to arrive, park up and he would then walk the orders out and leave them by the car, thus not transgressing any social distancing rules. My slot was lunchtime yesterday - usefully - so I dashed over and collected per the plan. Top marks to Tonbridge for not taking the easy option and doing everything they can to help us enthusiasts keep working.



Most of the parts have arrived, but there were some which needed to come from Germany, in addition to only one of the trailing arm bolts being shipped from Reading across to Tonbridge. Strange, but nevermind...these are now being ordered by Chris and will come over in a week or so.

The final part of the Elephant Racing order are the bump steer correcting steering rack arms, these were due to arrive with ER midweek, then out for plating, then onwards ship to TurboKraft. Hopefully these will be with Chris this coming Wednesday, and then on to me.

Chris also suggested I add a couple of other choice upgrades to the steering - upgrades I confess to not even being aware of and both made by Rothsport Racing and available through Chris.....

1) A steering rack bracing kit generally meant for 964/993's wearing 18" wheels (which I'm not, I've got the factory 17" Cups)...but the stiffer the better.

2) Polyurethane steering rack mounting bushings, which will remove the slight sponginess of the steering. I've not noticed it being spongy, but I'm sure when swapped over it'll be noticeable.
Old 03-28-2020, 07:27 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1251 (permalink)
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In other news, the new bearing and seal press kits I bought a few weeks ago are lovely bits of kit - however, the largest sleeve in bearing kit isn't large enough to "receive" the rear wheel bearing. A 76mm OD sleeve is used to push out from the inboard side, but it needs a sleeve of 89mm ID (min) for the bearing to pull into.

So, time to order some steel - thankfully this come through and wasn't thwarted by the lockdown.



Of course, most of this will end us as swarf, but I wanted a 1-piece tool to match the rest of the set rather than use a tube and a stepped top-hat that engages into it. Mind you, it would've saved a LOT of work had I taken the easy option!



No kidding, this has taken two full evenings and Saturday morning to make! Being 4" in diameter, I could only hold it using the external reverse jaws on the 3-jaw chuck, which have about half the gripping surface of the regular jaws - care needed.





This limited me to making small cuts to bore out the middle, starting with 1mm cuts on the inner bore, and slowing down to 0.8, 0.6 and then 0.4mm cuts as I reached the faster surface speed of the outside edge....it took forever going from 15mm to 90mm! In the process, the coolant suds were being sprayed everywhere, so some ad-hoc measures to prevent my workshop from flooding...



And eventually ended up with the finished article, perhaps not the finest looking piece, but bang on dimensionally and perfectly functional....





Immediately put to use, and the right rear bearing is out!....





Old 03-28-2020, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ian c2 View Post
Sorry for the delay spencer .
I only just realized when I saw this thread again today .
I just snapped some pics of the fronts , but it looks like you made your own solution now ?
They have a small spacer (4-5mm) between the top hat and the monoball .
No sticktion there whatsoever .

If you need more , let me know .
( Iím subscribing , so Iíll get notification of replies )
Cheers Ian!

Yes, I have now sorted it thanks, but I can see that the solution you have on the fronts also uses a nut on the shaft that looks to go down into the bearing itself, rather than just a simple Nyloc hex nut that sits on top. I have heard of these, and are used to address the situation where not enough of the thread on the shaft protrudes through the mount, to put a nut on it. This is the situation I had, where the ID of the top mount bearing isn't big enough to make a "reverse nut"....hence why I opened up the ID of my conical top hats, so they slide lower down onto the damper shaft, and not mounting up to the step. I've not machined anything that came with the KW's or the ER parts, so if my solution doesn't work (perhaps not enough height adjustment?) then I can revert and try something else.
Old 03-28-2020, 07:36 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1253 (permalink)
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So, after a well-deserved lunchbreak and a mug of tea, this afternoon was spent clearing up the workshop, ridding the lathe of armfuls of razor sharp swarf and giving it a good old wipe down - it's been shamefully long since doing this, my old college machining tutors would be having a blue fit (before any of the apprentices went home each afternoon, every lathe, mill, drill and workbench had to be immaculate, every tool back into the Stores and in inspection done).

Then onto more of the fun stuff, the mission being to get that RHS trailing arm off the chassis.

Job 1 - Remove the handbrake cable. First attempt using molegrips didn't show any signs of working, at least, not without mullering the ferrule in the process. Attempt two was to again try one of the parallel punches through the aperture where the cable runs through, but this time using a decently weighted ball pein hammer rather than a rubber faced mallet. Success!! That sharp metal contact obviously dislodged it enough to get it out....my Step 3 would've been to cut it and replace, so I'm glad it didn't come to that.

Job 2 - Make copious notes and take photos of the current toe and camber settings. At the very least, I know they work to some extent, and will act as a starting point upon rebuilding.



Job 3 - Loosen the fixings on the spring plate, and prepare to remove the whole arm.

Again, the 3/4" sq. drive breaker bar came in so handy, and within minutes the fixings were broken free. The air impact wrench did the hard work of removing them the rest of the way, and before I knew it, the trailing arm was off.





Clearly the suspension has been apart before in a previous life, as the M14 bolts for the front pivot and the spring bar are both coated in copper slip grease, which I'm sure the factory didn't use.

The spring plate bushes have seen better days, with the usual problem of the seals deteriorating to the point of crumbling....









So, one corner done. The other rear assembly is coming off tomorrow, then its time to get into the engine bay, remove the intercooler and undo the fixings for the damper top mounts.
Old 03-28-2020, 04:04 PM
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So, last night was spent "off project" - The fluorescent lamp units in my garage and workshop were gradually failing (the electronic ballast packs), to the point where one of them was tripping the mains circuit. At best, I had 1 of 4 working lights in the workshop (fortunately the one above the lathe) and 3 of 4 working in the garage (unfortunately the dead one was above the corner I'm dismantling).

Enough is enough, time to replace the old skool tubes with new LED tubes. Easy enough to do, with some minor re-working of the electrics inside each light fitting (essentially bypassing these failing ballast packs).

At the same time, switching from a colour temp of "regular" 4000k to 6500k "daylight". The 5ft workshop lights were easy enough, but the 6ft garage ones a little trickier, as they were slightly different internally and obviously I had to work over the car - lots of protective covers and care required.

To anyone thinking about doing it - just do it. The price per tube has now come down significantly; I paid £19 for each 6ft tube and £14 for the 5ft (both +VAT), 8 of each from a local electrical wholesaler. The difference is astounding but difficult to capture in a photo. I said to Chris last night, I may as well have been working with a Charles Dickens candle light for all these years, such is the difference. The 6ft tubes are also almost half the power, 30W per tube versus 58W for the fluorescent tubes. That's a healthy saving when you have 16 of them burning for hours at a time. The added bonus is that they light up instantly, and don't require a few minutes to heat up and get to full brightness.

So, now I can see clearly again.....
Old Yesterday, 07:42 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #1255 (permalink)
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A quick projectette in the workshop over lockdown-lunch, 20mins away from a laptop!

Thought I'd have a look and see what's involved with removing the bush from the spring plate that came off the other day. Well, one thing led to another, and before I knew it, it was out. Dead. Simple.

Step 1 - remove the 2 x wire spring hoops which retain the rubber seal on the non-tapered side of the plate. Using a pick, these came off very easily, and pulled the boot off with it.







Step 2 - remove a lot of the grease that's still inside the joint. I gave the area a wire brush clean while I was at it, just because.





Step 3 - Find a suitable bearing removal sleeve to sit the plate into, while pressing it out on the hydraulic press. 78mm ID is the one you need. New bearing removal kit proving very useful straight away, can't beat having the right tools.



Step 4 - Per the instructions from Elephant Racing, use a gas torch to heat up the rubber lining, non tapered side. When it starts smoking and the garage stinks like a pikey caravan site, you know it's getting warm enough. New MAPP gas torch worked a treat - again, wish I'd bought one years ago. Now use the hydraulic press to push on the metal "mushroom" centre part of the bush, the whole assembly then slides out beautifully, taking the rubber with it.





Step 5 - Ta da. Ready for wire brushing and re-plating. Hopefully the insertion of the new ER monoball will be as straightforward.



FOR SALE - 1 x LIGHTLY USED SPRING PLATE BUSH - £0 ONO


Old Yesterday, 08:02 AM
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