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Kartoffelkopf
 
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Just a very quick update this evening. Spent this morning undoing a lot of the good rebuilding work I've done! All anticipated, per the update the other day, I wanted to remove the charging loom and get a new one made. A good couple of hours disassembling the LH ducting, the cooling fan, the belt tension switch, the fan pulleys and so on, then obviously all the sensors that are on that loom (boost pressure, oil pressure, fan switch, oil temp) and all of the retention P-clips. Then the wrestle of partially removing the fan, removing the alternator cover and unbolting the loom. Getting the loom back through the shroud and out from the underside of the intake system was a bit of a git, just being super careful not to snag the main management loom or pull any vacuum lines off. But, it's now out and I think it's going to be a very worthwhile exercise; another case of using non-Raychem sleeving and it's already looking beaten up and tatty. The cable is way heavier duty than is needed, and adds significant bulk. All I need to do now is arrange a time to go across and make it.

I spent an hour or two playing with the throttle linkage as well this afternoon; I really don't know how I messed this up so monumentally, but after spending weeks designing and making the new linkage to accommodate the eThrottle potentiometer a couple of years ago, I somehow completely misaligned where the throttle cable enter through the tinware; by about 60mm to the left! Clearly had a brainstorm that evening, and only realised when I was hooking up the engine after reinstalling it. I "made do" at the time, and used another hole in the tinware to run the cable through, then if memory serves, I also had to take some slack out with a spacer between the inner and outer cables. Well, this time I'm getting it done right, but it does mean some reworking of that linkage....which is nicely anodized and plated.....oh well, needs must, I'll pretty-it-up again afterwards.

Oil return lines and filter between the turbo catch tank and the scavenge pump have now been thoroughly cleaned through in the tank; filter separated and rinsed, old scabby heatshrink on the lines removed and reassembled ready for install.

Turbo Oil Scavenge Line/Filter
Remembering back a few years to conversations that were had about filtering the oil line pre or post scavenge pump, and the suggestion a couple of weeks ago to move it post-pump; in retrospect, I'm going to keep it as-is. I remember buying a fairly coarse filter insert, so not to create too much load on that pump. Placing it pre-pump then protects the scavenge pump from any debris, should the bearing in the turbo have a catastrophic failure. There's also the fact that the 964 Turbo has it's oil filter located differently in the oil circuit to the 930 Turbo; the 964T protects the engine with oil entering it from the main tank and cooling circuit. If I'm correct, this isn't the case with 930's? (930 has the filter either mid circuit or on exit?...sure someone will correct me on that).

Anyway, that's about where I'm up to - no pics tonight, as there's nothing meaningful to show on the linkage just yet. Hope everyone had a very pleasant Christmas break?

Last edited by Spenny_b; 01-21-2018 at 04:16 AM..
Old 12-26-2017, 02:01 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #941 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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I've just noticed....it's 6 years ago today that I sat on a sun-drenched balcony at my Parents second home in Madeira, beer in hand, scribing the update where the engine and 'box were removed from the car (right at the foot of Page 1).

Well bloody hell. "It's flown by"



(kidding)



So, I began musing - as you do over a holiday period - about the things which have changed in that time;
  • I've got (even) less hair and now in my mid 40's
  • I've changed the company I work for twice
  • I now have a pretty decently equipped dedicated workshop (the original teardown was in my garage), purely to do this project
  • Chris and I used to talk on a telephone....
  • ...we now talk using FaceTime or WhatsApp - both of which were barely conceived technologies back then.
  • Chris now has decent broadband comms!
  • Chris has also moved premises since then
  • My daughter was in her early years at enfant school, she's now in her early years at senior school, with junior school having been and gone (which is perhaps the scariest change of all to me)
  • The Porsche aircooled market has gone crazy since buying mine
  • Five different "other" cars have been/gone/stayed from the Spenny_b stable
  • The price of UK fuel has actually gone down since then (by a decent amount to start with, but then gradually come back up)
  • I've perhaps got even more obsessive with the build than I ever was, or intended being when I set out 6yrs ago!
  • I'm still as irritable, but far more broke!
Old 12-26-2017, 03:01 PM
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Deeply the continuation Spencer!
Old 12-27-2017, 01:15 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #943 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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New engine "chassis" loom now made by Simon @ Sileck, and another grand job it is too. Made using Raychem Type 44 wire (as are the other harnesses) and wrapped in more Raychem DR-25 sleeving, plus "Claremont" green kevlar sleeving over the starter motor +VE cable. We've used a pukka Raychem "T" boot for the split outside of the shroud, the area that looked really quite scruffy on my version of the harness, where the glued heatshrink had given up.

The drawing board, literally...



Cannibalising my original (new) harness...



In progress, soldering onto the original Txx connector that interfaces chassis to engine...



Finished article...



What's left of my loom, made 5yrs ago. Connector plugs, grommets and covers carefully removed, as they're no longer available from Porsche



It needed a quick fettle today with the alternator feeds to ensure they don't come anywhere near the impeller at the back. This time I've made a stainless steel tab, mounted where the ground wire used to bolt on to (M5), which I've then used a cable tie to pull that part of the harness down and away. A lip on the s/s tab ensures the tie won't go anywhere. You can just about see what I'm on about....



The ground cable now loops around the perimeter of the alternator, inside the conical cover of course, and attaches to the M6 bolt adjacent to where it used to mount, onto the ground tab of one of the controllers or rectifiers. Wrestling the loom back in under the intake plenum is equally as much fun as getting it out, and I'm currently rebuilding the fan onto the engine, the ducting, fan belts, etc. (teabreak)

Last night I knocked-up a couple of stand-offs to mount the second boost controller valve, which will sit on top of the first valve. Happy with how they've turned out - I was concerned that being M3, they wouldn't have the rigidity to stack the valve pairs, but it's absolutely fine and saves me having to drill/tap everything out to M4.



Clearance to the intercooler looked ok last week when I eyeballed the idea. This second controller will be operating in "anti-phase" mode to the first controller, i.e., there will always be air supplied to either the top half of the wastegates, or the bottom half. Of course, this is always the case anyway, but you only normally get to control the minimum boost pressure by way of the lightest springs installed into the WG's; that then becomes your minimum boost pressure, be that 0.7bar (which it was with mine) or higher.

With phase + anti-phase control, in theory you could remove the WG springs altogether, and modulate the valves on either the top or bottom of the WG's to open/close the valves and bleed exhaust gas. In reality, you do still install very light springs, to prevent flutter and add a little control to them, but it does mean that we can then map right the way down to 0bar boost...if we wanted to. Apparently, this was done by Torque Developments for the current owners of the Ferrari 333SP LM prototype, which enabled them to absolutely blitz the competition in wet weather qualification; wind the boost right the way down and go for it, whereas the others had to pussy-foot around the track. Of course, mines not a track car, but it's something that's there which will allow all weather drivability (I'm thinking a skiing holiday to the Alps!...)

Only some very minor plumbing changes needed; basically a source boost feed to each valve input, one valve then controls the top port of the WG's, the other valve controls the lower port. However, I'm about four -4AN fittings short from being able to plumb it together, so will have to wait until Tuesday when Think Automotive are open again.

Finally, I spent an evening modifying my throttle linkage. Can you believe, a whole evening making ONE bracket?! This is for the receptacle bracket to mount to (the bracket that the throttle cable sits into).



Ideally if I were to remake the whole linkage assembly, I'd be able to incorporate it by welding on a piece, but I'm not going to remake it, far too many hours spent doing it the first time. Some anodising of the bracket and it'll be great. Just waiting for some mild steel stock to arrive, then I can finish the rotating linkage where the ball joint will screw into.

Last edited by Spenny_b; 12-30-2017 at 09:46 AM..
Old 12-30-2017, 09:43 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #944 (permalink)
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Brilliant Spencer, I hope to be able to do it one day also on my engine!
Old 12-30-2017, 12:00 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #945 (permalink)
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Happy New Year folks, thanks for following my little project all-these-years. I know I said it last year, and quite probably the year before that, but this really is the year that the car will get back on the road, and I can quit pestering your Inbox with update notifications. You do have thread update notifications set, don't you?

Soooo....it's another wet and windy day here in the UK (same for most of the Christmas holiday period), therefore another fine opportunity to get out into the workshop and (in the words of YouTubes Dale Derry), "build something cool". Well....brackets...not that cool, but very useful.

First up was to rework the fuel pressure regulator assembly, only because it now fouls the repositioned throttle linkage entry. To explain, there was a loop of hose from the FPR exit (under the regulator) back to a rigidly mounted Male > Male M14 junction. This was a neat setup, removing any dangling hoses and giving you something rigid to tighten the chassis-side fuel return line onto. However, the positioning of it was just too close to the FPR if that loop of hose was to be removed; the FPR can't be moved, as it bolts directly onto the end of the fuel injection rail.

The plan, in which case, was to simply do-away with the M/M fitting. I could reuse it by simply cutting off the remainder of the bracket, but it's a little large and ungainly; I can do better.

Some lathe action yesterday with a fresh bar of ally hex stock, and we have a new M/M adapter with the 30 concave seat.



(I also made another M14 x 1.5 blanking plug for installing into the crankcase chimney. I know I made one years ago for this, but no idea where it's gone. Looks a lot smarter than bolting in an old temp sensor)

I did double-check the mating faces by screwing on one of the M14 fittings after some engineers blue (nah, blue Sharpy) had been applied to the concave faces. As you can see, once it was nipped up there looks to be good interference to seal those joints. Just needs to be anodised.




Next job, hack off the old M14 fittings on the bracket....5mins, 1x hacksaw, 3x files and a cup of tea. This can now be added to my "plating" pile.



There's now plenty of space around the throttle link mounting area; a lot cleaner.





A job which has been bugging me for ages, was to re-mount the pressure sender used for my Stack boost gauge. I originally mounted it horizontally, but to avoid damage due to condensation it should be mounted vertically (or horizontally inverted). Some care taken to mark it out accurately and a reduction to M5 fittings so that I can tap those holes (M6=too coarse, not enough thread engagement), and it's another job off of the list.



Just waiting for a set of stepped drills to arrive on Wednesday, then time to pretty it up a little before it can also go in the anodising box.

The next bracket is the turbo hanger. A change in gasket philosophy for the headers has meant that the exhaust system hangs 2-3mm lower than previously, which in turn has misaligned my hanging bracket to the crankcase. Some stainless spacers under each mounting mount easily corrects that little issue.






Getting really close to everything being finished on the engine. I'm now waiting for some bright mild steel stock to arrive, so that I can finish the throttle linkage, then some welding to be done, hopefully on Saturday. I'll need to allow probably a week or two at the plating shop, in the meantime I can get on with making the plate for the new ECU & WiFi router which sits under the passenger seat, finish the harness installation and get the interior back together again. I'll also finish off some small jobs with the new ignition system, specifically mounting the CoP's.
Old 01-01-2018, 11:01 AM
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"WiFi router?"

Is this beast going to have its own facebook page?
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Old 01-04-2018, 12:32 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #947 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 304065 View Post
"WiFi router?"

Is this beast going to have its own facebook page?


Not quite, but yes, a travel wi-fi router is going to be used to broadcast (securely, of course) a local hotspot so that calibration work can be done without the need to fumble under the seat to either retrieve or plug-in an LAN cable. A Cat5e cable has been built into the chassis side of the harness, which will plug directly into the TP-Link unit. Not powered it up yet, but it's a very neat little thing, half the size of an iPhone X (2x the thickness) and only about $40 from memory.



Old 01-04-2018, 12:50 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #948 (permalink)
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Ok, update time....

Not a huge amount of progress as I've been helping Lucy make some pieces for her DJI drone over the weekend.

But, a few more odds-n-sods jobs addressed.

The Aeroquip fire-sleeving is now on the wastegate hoses, the turbo oil drain hose and the drip tank return line to the scavenge pump. These lines were previously sleeved in the foil covered fibrous material, but frankly, it hasn't survived at all well even with the modest mileage that I did with the car before the teardown. The reflective coating has flaked off, and the fibrous material has started to crumble. Instead, I've now bought the orange NASA-looking stuff (!), and then sealed the ends with silicone tape. This was a tip given to me by Matt @ Think Automotive (great bloke, btw...and was in that episode of Wheeler Dealers where they're making a new hose for the Lamborghini Uraco), and I have to say, I'm really pleased with how it looks and how bloody good this tape is! I'm sure it's the same stuff they use for making silicone hoses, self amalgamating and non-sticky to the touch. It'll save the inner woven material from getting grubby, and apparently will withstand the temps.





I needed to make an offset mount for one of the CoP units; the top intake side coil on #6 sits within the cutout for the ABS pump belt tower, and despite doing a mock build when reworking the coils, for some reason it now doesn't fit onto the stud I intended it locating onto. Not a difficult fix, I just milled a piece of 19mm ally hex bar with 1x 6mm thread underneath and an offset 6mm thread on the top. I didn't snap a pic before taking a batch of parts for plating, but will do so when it returns in a week or two.

My order of plumbing parts arrived from Think last week, with the NPT and -4AN fittings I need to re-work the hoses for the anti-phase boost control valve.

The throttle linkage has also now been reworked; the bracket I made a week or so ago, that was going to be bolted down with M4 fasteners, is now welded. I had second thoughts, insomuch that all other brackets on that assembly are welded, so for consistency.....

The rotating actuator that links the eGas potentiometer to the throttle cable from the cabin is also now rectified. My bar of 10mm bright mild steel finally arrived after the Christmas hiatus so that I could make the bar that now reaches over to the outboard side of the engine, rather than inboard. A gusset strengthens everything; I really don't want to be reworking this piece once the engine's installed.

The new dashboard and engine charging loom that Simon made is back in (did I mention that previously?)

Finally, the whole shopping list of parts that I need plating or anodising are now with my plating shop. I'm guessing that they're playing catchup after the Christmas shutdown, so really I'm in the lap of the plating Gods as to how long this will take - anticipating a fortnight.

In the meantime, I'm going to get the ECU loom installed into the cabin, but upon typing up the words for the previous Syvecs and TP-Link pics, I had a moment of realisation....I forgot to ask Simon to include a switched 5v supply for the wi-fi router....doh. Never mind, better to realise now; I'll zip along there for another quick rework and to collect the old auxiliary peripheral loom (to boost setting switch, traction control and boost gauge) which needs remaking slightly longer for the new ECU. It'll certainly be a lot neater to run the 5v from the ECU loom than feeding a switched 12v from the dashboard, then stepping it down to USB 5v using another interface harness.

Back soon...hopefully with lots of shiny stuff to show (and bolt on)
Old 01-09-2018, 03:25 PM
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 304065 View Post
Biiiig Apollo photo
What's with the "United States" bumper sticker....like the rest of the world didn't bloody know already! lol

Anyway, I see your LM and I raise you this....






Last edited by Spenny_b; 01-14-2018 at 08:12 AM..
Old 01-14-2018, 08:10 AM
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Time for a quick update...well, apart from a lot of brain work, there's not been too much activity on the engine itself for the last fortnight. What I have done is seriously pull my finger out and clearing the decks of a tonne of old Westfield parts, a few Porsche parts including the old ECU. Lots of stuff sold, lots of space reclaimed, and a few sheckles back in the piggy bank.

In terms of this project, it's holding formation until the plating shop finishes their work. They've now finished the black anodizing, which I've collected (apart from one piece, that annoyingly they forgot to put in the box, but assured me it was all there....thankfully it's been found)

So in absence of spannering, what I have been doing is putting some thought into re-starting the project of water cooling the turbo. Turbobrat930 has been building and playing with an excellent installation on his 930 here in the Turbo/Supercharging Forum. Bravo to him, great job. He does say, however, that the filler neck integrated into the top tank of his radiator, isn't perhaps ideal for regular checking and topping-up, as it's mounted behind his wheelarch liner on the RHS of the car.

A visit to Think Automotive, and 3hrs of Tino and myself scratching our heads and walking their stores, has resulted in (what I hope is) a great little setup that takes Turbobrats great work and customises it to my requirements and needs.

(BTW - for any UK based folk, Think Auto have now moved into a really nice new premises. Hats off to Matt and the team, I understand it's been a monumental effort for the last 3 months, and they're still moving stock over from the old shop, but it's a lot more conducive to sitting down and planning a plan. Thoroughly recommend going across and visiting them - apart from anything else, the parking's a whole lot better!)

These are some pics I took to try and illustrate my thinking....vernier calliper box representing the size matrix I originally planned to use....an Uncle Bens lunch pot representing the water pump

Whether I mount the matrix parallel to the ground, or parallel to the valve cover, I don;t yet know...


Depending on the matrix mounting, I may weld on some tabs onto the supporting frameworl, to mount the pump...


This is the kit of parts as it now stands, and with as much forward thinking as we could do. Of course, things may change once I get underway with fabricating the frame that will hold the cooler matrix in place...we'll see.....I just wish I had a decent welding rig so I could crack on and start tacking pieces of the framework into place.




Bosch pump....


Cooler rad with really neat internally threaded mounting lugs...


4" Spal Cooling fan, which will mount underneath the rad, pulling air through...


I did originally think about using a BMW Mini R53 generation turbo cooling pump; only 35 from a main dealer, tiny and comes with a bracket that looks to have many options for mounting it....however, electrically I'm not entirely sure how this is driven. I know that E90 gen BMW's use CAN bus controlled pumps. However CAN bus as implemented in noisy/critical environments uses 2x signal pins, CAN-Hi, CAN-Lo and its the crossover of these (Hi being pulled low, Lo being pulled high) that is the trigger point, either on or off. There is such thing as single signal CAN, but from what I understand, it's used is less critical and noisy environments, for things like cabin heater control, infotainment systems, etc. This Mini pump has 3 pins, not 4; from the wiring diagrams we have, one is +12v. Another *must* be Gnd, leaving one...unlikely to be CAN bus, probably PWM control, but....there's a lot to be said for keeping it simple(r) and using a relay to control a basic 12v pump. Which is what I decided, and have got a Bosch unit instead. In for a penny...


Interestingly, by stumbling upon Garretts whitepaper on water cooling for their water-cooled turbo's, I found out something I wasn't aware of; I did already know about syphoning effects of the cooling system, but apparently by rotating the CHRA by 20, they report up to a 50C temperature drop. They even go so far as saying that on traditional water cooling systems on cars (i.e. with a mechanically driven water pump), it's most likely that an auxiliary electric water pump is unlikely to be required, to continue water flow through the CHRA after engine shutdown. Of course, we don't have that luxury, but it does show the potential of getting the plumbing right and using syphoning to your advantage.

Anyone know what torque to tighten both the compressor and turbine housings up to? Clearly one will be more than the other. I have emailed Garrett, but typical corporate-black-hole so far.
Old 01-23-2018, 01:46 PM
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Good night Spencer, I began to worry not seeing update of your project!
The work of brain is I think more important that the manual labor in itself, both go of pair anyway.

Very good idea that to cool your turbo in the water, will also need to find the good location, continues like that, bravo!
Old 01-23-2018, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spenny_b View Post
Interestingly, by stumbling upon Garretts whitepaper on water cooling for their water-cooled turbo's, I found out something I wasn't aware of; I did already know about syphoning effects of the cooling system, but apparently by rotating the CHRA by 20, they report up to a 50C temperature drop.
That's impressive! Thanks for sharing.
Old 01-23-2018, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spenny_b View Post
What's with the "United States" bumper sticker....like the rest of the world didn't bloody know already! lol

Anyway, I see your LM and I raise you this....





Everyone always thinks the Americans were the first to put a man on the moon. But no lads, they were the first to put a man on the moon and bring him back. But Morgan, he never came back.

Got a postcard though. Said "'tis cheese!", in in parenthesis "Caerphilly".
Old 01-25-2018, 02:13 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #955 (permalink)
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Lots of small jobs done.....

All the plating work is now back with me, which has enabled me to get all those odd'n'sods pieces back onto the engine again:
  • The boost pressure sender for the dashboard boost gauge is now mounted on the IC bracket.
  • The 4x turbo flange bolts now have stainless locking nuts (aircraft nuts, not nyloc of course), versus the previous plain nuts + spring washers.
  • The fuel pressure regulator is now secured again to the modified bracket, onto the inlet manifold.


  • The throttle linkage assembly is now back together....with the cable support now in the correct place (!). It fits perfectly under the plenum chamber of the 1-2-3 intake system, clearing by a handful of mm. A stover nut on the pivot shaft has now replaced the nyloc; I was conscious that with the heat of the engine bay, the correct tightness of this nut would change, causing a loose linkage in a completely inaccessible place.
  • I removed the 3x M8 studs that are used to hold the linkage onto the crankcase - with the eGas throttle pot bolted in place on the linkage, it was extremely diffcult to mount it with the intake system also bolted down. So, instead I've removed the studs and chased the M8 thread with a tap to open them up and allow M8 capheads to be used from the "top side". Looks neater than nyloc nuts as well.


  • The M-M fuel adapter I made is now fixed onto the engine end of the fuel inlet hose.
  • The M14 bung has now substituted the temp sender in the crankcase chimney.




Another delivery arrived this morning from Think Automotive with a few more fittings. I've decided to plumb in a 1/4" system return hose, going from the furthest point on the system from where the header tank feeds, back into the top of the header tank.

I've now also assembled a new -4AN oil feed line to the turbo. The previous line had a zinc plated 90 -4 fitting that mounts onto the flow restrictor on the CHRA, and although perfectly functional, had started to corrode with the heat from the turbine housing. The clear PVC coating had also started to go brown with the heat. So....I had a left over length of hose from the previous aborted water system project; a length intended to run to one of the wastegates. Now cut to length, covered in Raychem DR25 along with some fire sleeve and now terminated in a forged 90 aluminium -4 fitting. Forged fittings don't flow as well as swept fittings, but this is a restricted oil feed anyway, so shouldn't cause an issue here.





Hose not tightened onto the turbo deliberately, as my new turbine heat shield is now in the country, import duties paid and should be delivered to me on Monday....



So, lots of odd jobs now done, included a very Cathartic clean-up mission in the workshop...tomorrows job is now to crack on with the water cooling system; I've had a few cunning ideas during the last few days, about how to mount everything, so fingers crossed another productive day tomorrow whilst watching the Daytona 24hrs on IMSA.tv.

Last edited by Spenny_b; 01-27-2018 at 03:32 PM..
Old 01-27-2018, 03:04 PM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #956 (permalink)
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Hi Spencer, It is always a great pleasure to follow your work of silversmith, continues like that!
Old 01-28-2018, 12:31 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #957 (permalink)
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Spenny, from certain angles that pink silicone hose cladding looks like a frankfurter, albeit a space-grade frankfurter. John
Old 01-29-2018, 08:05 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #958 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Hell Fire Corner, near Reg Seat of Gvmnt 12
Posts: 1,493
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeffries View Post
Spenny, from certain angles that pink silicone hose cladding looks like a frankfurter, albeit a space-grade frankfurter. John
It's exactly frankfurter coloured! Not so tasty though....
Old 01-29-2018, 08:07 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #959 (permalink)
Kartoffelkopf
 
Spenny_b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Hell Fire Corner, near Reg Seat of Gvmnt 12
Posts: 1,493
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat RUFBTR View Post
Hi Spencer, It is always a great pleasure to follow your work of silversmith, continues like that!
Cheers buddy!
Old 01-29-2018, 08:07 AM
  Pelican Parts Catalog | Tech Articles | Promos & Specials    Reply With Quote #960 (permalink)
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