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Assembling 1966 901/05 Engine: Phase V- The Final Exam

It's done.

Four years later.

My engine is complete.

The short version, for those of you reading this between subway stops, is this:

It doesn't leak, smoke, or make bad noises, and the blowby after two hours is minimal.

It made 137 Hp on the engine dyno with SSI, NOS Leistritz exhaust, the factory aircleaner housing and a Mahle pleated paper airfilter in place, with 32 degrees total timing.

I am very, very happy with how it came out, and very grateful to the community for helping me get it to the finish line.

The long version:

After a few setbacks, including snapping a rocker shaft which then had to be drilled out, I finally completed engine assembly. But simply getting it done was not enough-- it had to be perfect, because I was going for The Final Exam.

The Final Exam would be the harshest, most objective test possible, involving exposing my work to scrutiny of a true expert, followed by a run on the engine dyno. Any failures or weaknesses would be immediately apparent: mistakes could result in a fist-sized hole in the case, and a trip back to the starting point.

And there was only one person on the East Coast that I wanted to administer The Final Exam.

Peter Dawe.

Peter Dawe, for those of you who don't know him, runs a race shop with his sons in East Stroudsburg, PA, just over the New Jersey border.

One visit to the shop and you know that he is a SERIOUS engine builder and race preparer. Cases stacked up like cordwood. Immaculate, air-conditioned engine room with both water and aircooled motors in various stages of completion. Cup cars lined up like a frozen starting grid. He builds more Porsche motors in a week than I will build in my remaining lifetime.

In terms of experience, Peter used to work for ANDIAL, which was basically Porsche's racing operation in the USA in the 70's: its name a contraction of the three founders: Arnold Wagner (AN); Dieter Inzenhofer (DI) and Alwin Springer (AL). Yes, THAT Alwin Springer.

Peter was their second employee in 1975, the only one who didn't speak German.

He was, in short, the ideal person to administer The Final Exam. I should add that Peter is one of the nicest, most easy to get along with people that I've ever encountered in our community, and was extremely helpful and generous with his advice.

I left the engine in his capable hands. There was no turning back.



I asked Peter to check things out before starting the engine, and I'm glad I did. In my struggle to get the rocker shafts to proper torque, for whatever reason, I aligned the M5 heads with the thick side of the cam tower ribs, not the thin side. Points off. This had to be reset, along with the shaft torque, and also the valve adjustment. But at least I knew it was correct before the starter turned.

I was also nervous about the cam timing. In my last checks, I found that the setting was not in the middle of the 3.8-4.0 range where I thought I had put it-- it had changed to 4.0 for the left cam, and 4.26 for the right. So I retimed the cams using mechanical tensioners, and nailed it in the center of the range, which was confirmed by Peter with his checks.

Our plan was that he would start the engine on a test stand to get it running and to set the basic timing and carb adjustments, and then once it was running, move it to the engine dyno. On the test stand, he found that the engine was making VERY high oil pressure for some reason, like 120 PSI. That is too much, it would flatten the rod bearings at that level, so he removed the pressure relief piston and fixed the problem. He also found that one of the carb shafts wasn't quite right, and took care of that.

He got it to idle, and there was almost no smoke from the tailpipe, once the mouse nest that was inside my 40-year old NOS Leistritz muffler had blown out.

Once the engine was running, it was time for the dyno. Peter has a 30 year relationship with a friend nearby with a GoPower dyno. The engine was transported to the dyno and set up. I decided to use an MSD 6AL-2 and MSD High Vibration Blaster coil, at least to get started. The engine was installed in the dyno cell and run in with continuously variable throttle openings to seat the rings. By the time we got to the power pulls, there was barely any blowby at all-- I put my hand over the breather opening in the oil filler on the dyno's oil tank, and the airflow was barely detectable. This tells me that the rings have seated nicely.



The data speak for themselves:



I was very, very pleased with the results. Using stock jetting, the stock aircleaner with a Mahle paper element, stock EVERYTHING (you guys know this is a "concours" engine) the engine made 136.7 peak horsepower at 6500 RPM, and peak torque of 119.60 foot-pounds at 4500 RPM. Peter said that he's observed the dyno to be conservative by at least 10%, but this exercise isn't about the raw numbers, it's about making sure it all works together as a system.

What I am most pleased with is how flat the curves are-- in particular, the torque and AFR curves. The runs were made using 100 octane leaded race fuel. I plan to operate the engine on 93 octane pump gas, which will have 10 percent ethanol, so the AFRs will lean out somewhat from the dyno data. The requirement to operate on the reformulated Panther Pee that is sold to us as Gasoline is also why total timing was limited to 32 degrees.

At the end of the run, when we were taking the engine off the dyno, Peter turned to me and said, "Of all the guys who have built their own engines and brought them to me over the years, yours was the best, the most well prepared." A true gentleman. Thanks Peter.



* * * *

"If I have seen farther, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of Giants." - Sir Isaac Newton, 1676.

* * * *

With the engine complete, the last step is to thank the members of this community that made it possible.

First, to Wayne Dempsey, who had the foresight to create this forum and the determination to write and print the Engine Rebuild Book. Wayne's book is a huge leap forward in terms of demystifying the Porsche 911 engine, and this effort would not have been possible without it. (And a whole lot of parts from Pelican!)

Second, in no particular order:

Steve Weiner- for the Rods, and for many hours of free advice over the last decade, with a few airplane stories thrown in the mix.

Grady Clay- for his sage advice, most of all to "keep it original and make the performance mods invisible." His encyclopedic recall of the details of the early engines was invaluable in restoring this 46-year old time machine.

Henry Schmidt- for his advice to use SI valves for the exhaust and for many helpful tips along the way on this Forum.

Tom Butler-- for the crankshaft, engine tin, cam sprockets, ignition wires, wire harness and probably 10 other things I have forgotten that he thoughtfully supplied. Also, Tom was extremely helpful in originally devising the method for presenting the measurement results for the crank and other parts, his engineering background a huge asset.

Mike Serrone, who many years ago, did all my cadmium plating and powder coated the engine tin free of charge, and introduced me to the plating shop in the Bronx that is the source of all the beautiful silver hardware this engine wears.

Charles Navarro- for the JE Pistons and the Milennium Cylinders-- Charles was also very helpful in my piston choice and coordinated the boring of the cylinders. He was always available for advice or questions along the way.

Brad Davis-- the "Techno-Chemie" oil lines with blue tracer are his creation. Brad's commitment to originality and craftsmanship were a huge plus for this project.

John Colasante, racer, fellow New Yorker, who helped with the teardown many years ago.

George and Ike at Ollies, who did the case work, including the ceramic tumble-polishing of the case, a beautiful touch.

Harry Bieker, who restored the Weber 40IDA Carburetors.

Bob at Anchor Atlantic, who restored the cylinder heads.

John Dougherty, for the Supercup/102 camshafts and their nice flat torque curve.

Ed Fall at Vintage Werks, who restored and curved the Bosch cast-iron distributors.

Pacific Oil Cooler, who restored and ultrasonically cleaned the cooler and oil tank.

Matt at Euro-Electric Service in Massachusetts, who restored the original starter and alternator, even fabricating unobtanium parts to do so.

Mike at Millennium Plating, who plated the original intake manifolds in flash copper so they wouldn't dissolve in later plating steps.

And finally, to the hundreds of Pelicans over the years who have supported this project, offered advice, provided constructive criticism and in general been a part of it. If I have left anyone out, please accept my thanks for your advice and assistance, I couldn't have done it alone. It is truly. . .

THE ENGINE THAT PELICAN BUILT . . .

now stay tuned for the next episode, coming soon. . . . here is a preview

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Ex-'88 Carrera (Sold 3/29/02)
Ex-'91 Carrera 2 Cabriolet (Sold 8/20/04)

Last edited by 304065; 08-17-2012 at 04:18 AM..
Old 08-16-2012, 08:18 PM
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Congratulations and well-done! It's a thing of beauty. No video of it running for us??

Mike
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:02 AM
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John

Nice work... I am sure the car will run as well as the motor.

Keep us posted
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:09 AM
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Looks great!



(a dynamometer that is ten percent "conservative"... is that a nice way of saying it is wildly inaccurate or was he lying to try and make you feel good??)
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:09 AM
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Bravo!!
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geronimo '74 View Post
Looks great!


(a dynamometer that is ten percent "conservative"... is that a nice way of saying it is wildly inaccurate or was he lying to try and make you feel good??)
Any experienced dyno operator will tell you that the value of the instrument is in comparing changes before and after on the same dyno, not necessarily for comparing to other instruments. There are way too many variables and a lack of instrument-to-instrument calibration for that. The dyno used has a built in weather station and the results are run through the SAE correction algorithm.

Plus, he made the comment long before the power pulls were started, not after. Every motor that leaves Peter's shop sees the dyno, and remember that he also has a chassis dyno to break in and test gearboxes before his customers' cars leave his shop, so he has a reasonable dataset to make the claim.

In any event, it's easy to get sucked into the macho horsepower race-- the important thing to remember is that this test was intended to verify that everything had gone together correctly, to break in the motor before it ever went in the car, and most importantly, to check out the fuel curve, which as you can see is flat as a pancake.

Anytime you change more than one variable, it's good to test-- if I knew the engine was perfect then I would be OK fiddling with the carburetors, and if I knew the carbs were perfect I would be OK fiddling with the engine or ignition on my own. In this case, ALL the variables changed-- cam timing, carb adjustment, carb jetting, ignition, etc., hence a thorough checkout under known conditions was very important.
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Ex-'88 Carrera (Sold 3/29/02)
Ex-'91 Carrera 2 Cabriolet (Sold 8/20/04)
Old 08-17-2012, 08:33 AM
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great job John...continue on your quest to finish the car...I can't wait to see the entire project when it is all done...
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:09 AM
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Congratulations on a job well done. Thanks for sharing the process from an amateurs point of view.
Enjoy your toy.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:49 AM
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Finally.....

Will we get to see it at Lime Rock on Labor Day weekend ?

I remember seeing it there in black , what was it, 5 or so years ago ?
Sure has come a looooong way.

Thanks for sharing.
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:19 PM
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Great post John, helluva job!

reza
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Old 08-18-2012, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 304065 View Post
It's done.

Four years later.

My engine is complete.

The short version, for those of you reading this between subway stops, is this:


Mike at Millennium Plating, who plated the original intake manifolds in flash copper so they wouldn't dissolve in later plating steps.


THE ENGINE THAT PELICAN BUILT . . .

now stay tuned for the next episode, coming soon. . . . here is a preview

Great job on your engine. Do you have a web site or contact information for Mike at Millennium Plating?

Thanks,
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Old 08-31-2012, 10:53 AM
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Bert, here you go.

Magnesium Early Weber Manifolds- Plating Step #1- FLASH COPPER
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Old 09-01-2012, 05:28 AM
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Well done, Professor Cramer!!!

My compliments to the "Chef".

Your patience & perseverance has truly paid off and I'd bet the rest of the car is just as spectacular. I sure wish we lived closer,...
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:45 AM
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Thanks for the link.
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Old 09-07-2012, 11:32 AM
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901

That's awesome...Congratulations
Old 09-10-2012, 11:11 AM
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